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Full text of "Music [Bulletin]"

OYOLA UNIVERSITY 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 




Set II 



September, 1968 



• ACCREDITATION 



Loyola University 



Vol. XLX 



SEPTEMBER, 1968 



No. 6 



Published in the months of January, April, May, June, August, and September starting in 1952. 
Second-Class Postage paid at New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Loyola University, Incorporated April 15, 1912. Authorized to 
grant degrees by The General Assembly of Louisiana for the year 
1912. 

The Legal and Corporate Title of the University is "Loyola Uni- 
versity, New Orleans". 

All donations, endowments, legacies, bequests, etc., should be made 
under this title. 

Member of: 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
National Catholic Educational Association 
Jesuit Educational Association 
Association of American Colleges 



Accredited by the National 
Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education. 



Approved for Teacher Ed- 
ucation by the Louisiana 
State Board of Education. 



The College of Music of Loyola 
University is a member of the 
National Association of Schools 
of Music. The requirements for 
entrance and for graduation as 
set forth in this catalogue are 
in accordance with the National 
Association of Schools of Music. 



Ad Major em Dei Gloriam 



loyola university 




college 
of music 
bulletin 



1968-1969 



6363 St. Charles Avenue 
New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 



Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2011 witii funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/musicbulletin196869loyo 



Page 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 4-5 

ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE...... 28-29 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS... 19 

ATTENDANCE-ABSENCES-. 28-29 

AWARDS 17 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS..... 31 

CONCERTS 77-78 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Bachelor of Music 37-42 

Bachelor of Music Education 45-49 

Bachelor of Music in Music Therapy... 43 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 50-68 

FACULTY 9-13 

GRADES AND REPORTS 31 

GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

Master of Music Education 74 

Master of Music in Music Therapy 74 

Description of Courses 75 

GRADUATION 69 

HOUSING. 25-27 

ORGANIZATIONS 15-16 

PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 33 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 37-49 

PURPOSE AND AIMS OF THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC 14 

REFUNDS 23 

REQUIREMENTS IN APPLIED MUSIC 51-62 

TUITION 21-23 



^^^cademlc (^aienclc 



1968 - 1969 



s M T w T F s JUNE 1968 

1 10-11 Registration for A & S summer 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 session at Loyola. 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 12 Classes begin. 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 15-16 Registration Loyola summer ses- 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 sion in Mexico City. 

30 17 Classes begin in Mexico City. 



AUGUST & SEPTEMBER 

12 3 23 Terminal date for admissions. 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 27-31 Freshman orientation. 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 28 Registration — Seniors & Juniors. 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 29 Registration — Sophomores. 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 30 Registration — Freshmen. 

2 Labor Day. University holiday. 
Official opening of Fall Semester. 
Classes begin at 7:30 a.m. 
Late registration fee charged. 
Mass of Holy Spirit at 11:30 a.m. 
Latest date for registration. 
Latest date for changes or official 
dropping of courses. Grades of 
WP or WF will be given in those 
courses dropped after this date. 



OCTOBER 

12 3 4 5 23 Mid-semester grades due. 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 25 Latest date for application of can- 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 didates for degrees to be conferred 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 in May 1969. 

27 28 29 30 31 



NOVEMBER 

12 1 All Saints Day. University holiday. 

3456789 26 Latest date to drop a course in the 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Fall Semester. 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 27 Thanksgiving holidays begin after 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 last class. 

Dec. 2 Classes resume. 





3 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


3 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


3 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


4 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


6 


29 30 


6 



s M T w T F s DECEMBER 

1234567 12 Quiet Day. 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 13-20 Final examinations. Christmas 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 holidays begin after last examina- 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 tion. 

29 30 31 21 End of Fall Semester. 

27 Final grades due from faculty. 

, „ „ , JANUARY 1969 

12 3 4 

56789 10 11 ^^ Registration — Seniors and Juniors. 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 ^^ Registration — Sophomores and 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Freshmen. 

26 27 28 29 30 31 ^"^ Classes begin for Spring Semester. 

27 Late registration fee charged. 

FEBRUARY 

1 3 Latest date for registration. 

2345678 3 Latest date for changes or official 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 dropping of courses. Grades of 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 WP or WF will be given in courses 

23 24 25 26 27 28 dropped after this date. 

17-19 Mardi Gras. University holidays. 

MARCH 

1 1 Scholarship Auditions 

2345678 19 Mid-semester grades due. 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

APRIL 

12 3 4 5 2 Easter holidays begin after last 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 class. 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 7-9 Comprehensives. 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 8 Classes resume. 

27 28 29 30 14-18 Pre-advisory period for 1969-1970. 

26 Latest date to drop a course in the 

Spring Semester. 
30 Award Day at 10:30 a.m. 

MAY 

12 3 5-9 Senior examinations. 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12-20 Underclassmen examinations. 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 Ascension Thursday. 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 20 Baccalaureate Mass 10 a.m. 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 20 Commencement exercises 8 p.m. 

20 Close of academic year. 

26 Final grades due from faculty. 



d^oapci o/ i^eaents 



LOUIS H. PILIE, Chairman, Board of Regents, President, Structural Systems 
Corporation 

MURRAY C. FINCHER, Vice Chairman, Board of Regents, Vice President 
and General Manager, Southern Bell Telephone Company 

HENRY ZAC CARTER, President, Avondale Shipyards, Inc. 

HARRY N. CHARBONNET, Secretary-Treasurer, American Metal Inc. 

CHARLES I. DENECHAUD, JR., Attorney at Law 

FRANCIS C. DOYLE, Executive Vice President, National Bank of Commerce 
in New Orleans 

LAWRENCE J. FABACHER, Vice-President and General Manager, Jackson 
Brewing Co. 

ROY F. GUSTE, Attorney at Law 

ROLAND J. HYMEL, JR., President, Loyola Alumni Association, 1968 

EUGENE KATZ, President, The Katz Agency, Inc. 

MISS MARGARET E. LAUER, Certified Public Accountant 

JOHN LEGIER, Chairman of the Board, National American Bank 

DR. C. WALTER MATTINGLY, Physician 

JOHN W. MECOM, JR., President, New Orleans Saints 

LAWRENCE A. MERRIGAN, President, Bank of New Orleans and Trust Co. 

DR. MARTIN 0. MILLER, Physician 

J. EDGAR MONROE, President, Canal Assets, Inc. 

CLAYTON L. NAIRNE, President, New Orleans Public Service, Inc. 

JOHN A. OULLIBER, President, National Bank of Commerce in New Orleans 

HARVEY PELTIER, SR., Attorney at Law and Business Executive 

EDWARD D. RAPIER, Investment Securities 

JOSEPH M. RAULT, JR., President, Rault Petroleum Corporation 

DENNIS L. ROUSSEAU, President, Faculty Council of the University 

LEON SARPY, Attorney at Law 

HON. PRESTON L. SAVOY, Judge, Louisiana Court of Appeal 

SHELLEY SCHUSTER, Director, National Bank of Commerce in New Or- 
leans 

CLEM H. SEHRT, Vice Chairman of the Board, National American Bank 

CECIL M. SHILSTONE, President, Cecil M. Shilstone & Assoc, Inc. 

DR. ALFRED E. SMITH, Dentist 

TERENCE J. SMITH, President, T. Smith and Son, Inc. 

GEORGE J. SPRINGER, Investments-Finance 

AUGUST A. WEGMANN, Partner, J. K. Byrne & Company 

SEYMOUR WEISS, Business Executive 



HON. LOUIS H. YARRUT, Judge, Louisiana Court of Appeal 
VERY REVEREND HOMER R. JOLLEY, S.J., President, Loyola University 
REVEREND JOHN F. KELLER, S.J., Executive Vice-President, Loyola Uni- 
versity 
DONALD K. ROSS, Vice-President for Public Relations and Development, 
Loyola University 



uLJoard of rJ^irectorS 

VERY REV. HOMER R. JOLLEY, S.J. 
REV. JOHN F. KELLER, S.J. 
REV. FRANCIS A. BENEDETTO, S.J. 
REV. HAROLD L. COOPER, S.J. 
REV. JOHN A. CRONIN, S.J. 
REV. KARL A. MARING, S.J. 
REV. J. J. MOLLOY, S.J. 
REV. JOHN H. MULLAHY, S.J. 
REV. BERNARD A. TONNAR, S.J. 

LOUIS H. PILIE, Chairman of Loyola Board of Regents, ex officio 
MURRAY C. FINCHER, V ice-Chairman of Loyola Board of Regents, ex 
officio 



^^dministratiue Kyj^ficerd 



VERY REV. HOMER R. JOLLEY, S.J., Ph.D., President 
REV. JOHN F. KELLER, S.J., M.S., Executive Vice-President, Treasurer 
REV. F. A. BENEDETTO, S.J., Ph.D., Executive Assistant to the President 
JOHN F. CHRISTMAN, Ph.D., Vice-President for Academic Affairs, Director 

of Office of Academic Grants and Contracts 
REV. JOSEPH MOLLOY, S.J., A.B., Vice-President for Student Affairs 
J. MICHAEL EARLY, Ll.B., Vice-President for Broadcasting 
DONALD K. ROSS, M.B.A., Vice-President, Public Relations and Development 
JOHN L. ECKHOLDT, M.B.A., Vice-President for Business and Finance 
REV. BERNARD A. TONNAR, S.J., M.A., Dean 
ROBERT SABOLYK, B.S., Dean of Men and Director of Athletics 
MISS ROSALIE J. PARRINO, M.B.A., Dean of Women 
TED E. PFEIFER, M.A., Registrar 



KENNETH J. BYRNE, M.Ed., Director of Admissions 

RAYMOND P. WITTE, Ph.D., Director of the Evening Division 

REV. HAROLD L. COHEN, S.J., M.S., University Chaplain 

LT. COL. WARREN CLARK, B.A., Commandant of University R.O.T.C. 

JAMES G. VOLNY, M.S. in L.S., Librarian 

CHARLES R. BRENNAN, A.B., Director of Public Relations 

I. A. TIMMRECK, Ph.B., Alumni Director 



..Arddidtant ^.y^dminidtr'ative KypH 



icers 



REV. M. V. JARREAU, S.J., B.S., Assistant to the Vice-President, Public 
Relations and Development 

REV. FRANCIS L. JANSSEN, S.J., M.A., Assistant Director of Admissions 
MRS. JOHN J. McAULAY, Assistant Treasurer 

HENRY J. ENGLER, JR., M.B.A., Assistant Director for Development 
CHARLES E. YOUNG, B.S., Assistant Director for Development 
ARDLEY HANEMANN, B.S., Assistant Alumni Director 
MRS. DALE CURRY, B.A., Assista7it Director of Public Relations 
MRS. BETH PIGOTT, B.A., Assistant Public Relations Director for Publica- 
tions 



^^dmlnldtratii/e ^taff 



THOMAS R. PRESTON, Business Manager 

MARTIN A. BELANGER, M.D., University Physician 

JOSEPH TRUSS, Director of Men's Housing 

MRS. K. P. SIMONS, B.S.S., Directress of Women's Housing 

LOUIS SCHEUERMANN, Director of Intramural Program 

MRS. ROY WALTHER, B.B.A., Financial Aid arid Placement Director 

HENRY ASHER, JR., B.S., Director of Student Union 

MRS. MARY MYKOLYK, A.I.A., Director of Technical Planning 

THOMAS A. FROMHERZ, B.E. in C.E., Campus Planning Engineer 



^acult 



^ 



MICHAEL J. CARUBRA, B.M.E., Mus.M., M.M.E., Dean 

REV. LOUIS A. POCHE, S.J., Chaplain 

MRS. YOLANDA deR. TALLMAN, Secretary 



^Ued m. 



TP 



UdlC 



PIANO 



GUY F. BERNARD, Professor, Chairman 

B.M., Loyola University, Mus.M., Eastman School of Music 

JAMES W. BASTIEN, Assistant Professor, B.M., Mus. M. 
Southern Methodist University 

CHARLES E. BRASWELL, Associate Professor, B.M., No. Texas Univer- 
sity, M.M., American Conservatory of Music, R.M.T., Kansas University 

JANET SITGES MARTIN, Assistant Professor, B.M., Florida State, M.A., 
Mills College, Calfornia 

EUGIE TEBAULT PASSERA, Professor, B.M., Loyola University 

ELIZABETH B. SCHWARZ, Assistant Professor 

ORGAN 

ELIZABETH B. SCHWARZ, Assistant Professor, B.M.E., Loyola University 
ELISE CAMBON, Professor, B.A., Mus.M., University of Michigan 

VOICE 

DOROTHY BRUMFIELD HULSE, Professor, B.M., Loyola University 
MARY TORTORICH, Assistant Professor, B.M., Loyola University 
CHARLES PADDOCK, Instructor 
MILVERN IVEY, Instructor, B.M., M.M., North Texas State University 

VIOLIN 

RUSSELL BOBROWSKI, Instructor 
EWING POTEET, Instructor 



10 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

VIOLONCELLO _ 

HAL RUNYAN, Instructor 

DOUBLE BASS 

BRUCE BUTLER, Mus.M., Eastman School of Music, Assistant Professor 

CLASSICAL GUITAR 

PAUL J. GUMA, Instructor, B.M.E., Mus.M., L.S.U. 

HARP 

MME. LUCIENNE LAVEDAN, Instructor, B.A., Dominican College; 
Long-y School of Music 

FLUTE 

MAX SCHOENFELD, Instructor, B.M., Manhattan School of Music 
JOE B. BUTTRAM, Assistant Professor 

OBOE 

EUGENE W. CHIEFFO, Instructor, Curtis Institute of Music 

CLARINET 

MICHAEL CARUBBA, Professor 

LARRY COMBS, Instructor, B.M., Eastman School of Music 

JOE B. BUTTRAM, Assistant Professor 

SAXOPHONE 

MICHAEL J. CARUBRA 

JOE B. BUTTRAM, Assistant Professor 

BASSOON 

HAROLD BALLAM, JR., Instructor, B.M., Mus.M., Louisiana State Uni- 
versity 

FRENCH HORN 

CLAUS SADLIER, Instructor, B.M.E., Loyola University; Mus.M. Yale 
University 

TRUMPET 

GEORGE A. JANSEN, Assistant Professor, Juilliard School of Music 

TROMBONE 

PATRICK McCARTY, Assistant Professor 

ROBERT C. GILLESPIE, Instructor, Mus.M., Eastman School of Music 

TUBA 

BRUCE BUTLER, Assistant Professor, Mus.M., Eastman School of Music 

PERCUSSION 

FRANK STONE, Instructor 



Faculty 11 



Ok 



eoru 

PATRICK McCARTY, Associate Professor, B.M., West Virginia University, 

Mus.M., Ph.D., Eastman School of Music, Chairman 
GUY BERNARD 
MICHAEL CARUBBA 
CHARLES BRASWELL 
BERT A. BRAUD, Instructor, B.M.E., Loyola University; M.M.E. University 

of Southern California 
JOE B. BUTTRAM, Assistant Professor, B.M., M.M.E., North Texas State 

University; Ph.D., University of Kansas 
JANET SITGES MARTIN, Assistant Professor, B.M., Florida State, M.A., 

Mills College, Calif. 



Co 



ipodi 



ompodiiion 



itii 



PATRICK McCARTY, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Chairman 
BERT A. BRAUD, Instructor 



iVludic C^ducatL 



ucauon 

JOE B. BUTTRAM, Assistant Professor, Chairman 

MICHAEL CARUBBA, M.M., M.M.E. 

CHARLES BRASWELL 

GEORGE JANSEN 

PATRICK McCARTY 

MILVERN IVEY, Instructor, B.M., M.M., North Texas State University 

BLANCHE ZINK, Assistant Professor, B.A., Southern Methodist University; 

M.A., Ibid; Ph.D., University of Texas 
BERT A. BRAUD, Instructor 



iVludic ^ndembte 



ndembleA 

MICHAEL CARUBBA 

GEORGE JANSEN 

ARTHUR COSENZA, Special Lecturer, Opera Workshop 

JOSEPH HEBERT, Instructor, B.M.E., Loyola University; Mus.M., 

Manhattan School of Music 
MILVERN IVEY, Instructor, B.M., M.M., North Texas State University 



12 



LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



il'ludic ^nerapu 



CHARLES BRASWELL, M.M., M.M.E., R.M.T., Chairman 

MICHAEL CARUBBA 

CHRISTINE CHRISTMAN, B.M.T., R.M.T., Loyola University; M.S.W., 

Tulane University School of Social Work 
JOE B. BUTTRAM, Ph.D. 



i^Jiet 



LELIA HALLER, Premiere Danseuse, Academie de la Musique et de la Danse, 
Paris, France; Ballet Director N. 0. Opera Association 



5^. 



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C 



ommi 



itteeS 



ACADEMIC GRANTS 

Rev. F. A. Benedetto, S.J., 

Chairiinan 
Dr. John G. Arnold, Jr. 
Dr. Joe B. Buttram 
Rev. James C. Carter, S.J. 
Rev. Thomas H. Clancy, S.J. 
Bro. Clement Cosgrove, S.C. 
Dr. Paddy A. Doll 
Dr. Victor Halperin 
Rev. John H. Mullahy, S.J. 

ADMISSIONS STANDARDS 
AND POLICIES 

Dr. Robert T. McLean, 

Chairman 
Dean Michael Carubba 
Bro. Clement Cosgrove, S.C. 
Dr. Anthony DiMaggio 
Dr. Irving Fosberg 
Dr. Patrick McCarty 
Rev. Henry R. Montecino, S.J. 
Dean Anthony E. Papale 
Dr. Arthur Rayhawk 
Dr. G. Ralph Smith 
Rev. Bernard A. Tonnar, S.J. 
Dr. Raymond P. Witte 
Mr. Kenneth J. Byrne (consultant) 



ADMISSIONS REVIEW 
COMMITTEE 

Mr. Lawrence Strohmeyer, 

Chairviian 
Dr. E. Letitia Beard 
Dr. John V. Connor 
Mr. Anthony Gagliano 
Mr. Marcel Garsaud 
Dr. Mark D. Home 
Very Rev. Homer R. Jolley, S.J. 
Dr. Patrick McCarty 
Rev. Henry R. Montecino, S.J. 
Dr. Arthur Rayhaw^k 
Dr. Richard S. Wendt 

ATHLETICS 

Rev. Henry R. Montecino, S.J. 

Chairynan 
Dr. John G. Arnold, Jr. 
Dr. John V. Connor 
Mr. Roland J. Hymel, Jr. 
Rev. Robert J. Ratchford, S.J. 
Mr. Frank J. Stass 

CURRICULUM 

Rev. Bernard A. Tonnar, S.J. 

Chairynan 
All departmental chairmen 



Faculty 



13 



GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

Rev. Alvin J. Holloway, S.J., 

Chamnan 
Rev. James C. Carter, S.J. 
Dr. John W. Corrington 
Dr. Anthony DiMaggio 
Sr. M. Grace Swift 

TESTING 

Dr. Paddy Doll, 

Chairman 
Dr. John F. Christman 
Rev. Harold F. Cohen, S.J. 
Dr. Mary H. Macdonald 
Dr. Hilda C. Smith 

UNIVERSITY COUNCIL ON 
PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 
IN EDUCATION 

Rev. Joseph B. Tremonti, C.S.W., 

Chairman 
Rev. Emmett M. Bienvenu, S.J. 
Dean Michael Carubba 
Dr. John F. Christman 
Rev. Thomas H. Clancy, S.J. 
Dr. John W. Corrington 
Dr. Anthony DiMaggio 
Dr. Robert McLean 
Rev. John H. Mullahy, S.J. 
Rev. J. Eniile Pfister, S.J. 
Dr. Jesus Rodriguez 
Dr. Hilda C. Smith 
Rev. Bernard A. Tonnar, S.J, 
Mr. James G. Volny 

HIGH SCHOOL RELATIONS 

Mr. Lewis Todd, 

Chairman 
Mr. Charles Brennan 
Rev. Harold F. Cohen, S.J. 
Dr. Thomas Preston 

LIBRARY 

Rev. Robert J. Ratchford, S.J., 

Chairman 
Rev. Emmett M. Bienvenu, S.J. 



Dr. Patrick McCarty 
Rev. Henry R. Montecino, S.J. 
Rev. Charles E. O'Neill, S.J. 
Mr. S. Miller Williams 

PRE MEDICAL STUDIES 

Rev. John H. Mullahy, S.J., 

CYvairman 
Dr. Anthony DiMaggio 
Mr. Henry A. Garon 
Dr. Frank Komitsky, Jr. 
Rev. Henry R. Montecino, S.J. 
Dr. Walter G. Moore 

PUBLICATIONS 

Mr. Charles R. Brennan, 

Chairman 
Rev. Hubert F. Schiffer, S.J. 
Mr. S. Miller Williams 

RANK AND TENURE 

Dr. Walter G. Moore, 
Chairinan 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Rev. J. Joseph Molloy, S.J. 

Chairman 
Mr. Kenneth J. Byrne 
Mr. John L. Eckholdt 
Mrs. Veronica Egan 
Mr. Anthony Gagliano 
Rev. Alvin J. Holloway, S.J. 
Rev. J. Emile Pfister, S.J. 
Rev. Bernard A. Tonnar, S.J. 
Mrs. Mary Walther 

STUDENT CONDUCT 

Rev. Joseph Molloy, S.J. 

Chairman 
Rev. James C. Carter, S.J. 
Dr. John V. Connor 
Dr. Victor Halperin 
Mr. John J. McAulay 
Miss Rosalie J. Parrino 
Mr. Robert Sabolyk 
Chief Justice — Student Judicial Court 



Ljeneral ^nformati 



^J^idtor 



The New Orleans Conservatory of Music and Dramatic Art 
was founded in 1919 by Dr. Ernest E. Schuyten, who realized 
the need for a specializing school in the city of New Orleans. Dr. 
Schuyten was aided and supported in his undertaking by a number 
of leading teachers of New Orleans. 

In September, 1932, the Director of the New Orleans Conserva- 
try of Music and Dramatic Art was appointed by Loyola Univer- 
sity to found the College of Music and became its first Dean. 



A 



d ^.Arl 



urpode ana ^y^imd 

The purpose of the College of Music may be stated briefly as 
follows : to give the student intensive professional training in his 
particular field of interest, to equip him with a solid foundation of 
thorough musicianship, and to develop a sufficiently broad back- 
ground of general education to enable him to become an effective 
member of society. To accomplish this task, Loyola University has 
developed certain educational goals. These goals are: 

1. To ensure sound professional training 

2. To provide a foundation in the arts and sciences 

3. To encourage research and the continual acquisition of new 
knowledge 

4. To promote individual growth 

5. To improve the educational facilities of the University and 
the College of Music 

6. Loyola University's unity of thought emanates from its to- 
tality of outlook. God and the supernatural are at the basis 
of Jesuit education. The principle of integration in Loyola 
University is Catholic faith and practice. 

14 



General Information 15 



Ke treat 6 



There are no obligatory retreats at Loyola, but all students 
are encouraged to take part in one of the three types of retreats 
offered. The traditional closed retreats at one of the near-by retreat 
houses stress personal meditation and silence. A second type, called 
"An Experience in Christian Community" is offered to Loyola 
students and students of other colleges in the area. This type is 
made in a group of thirty of forty and stresses group discussion 
and activity. The third type is made in a private home with a group 
of ten to twelve. It stresses both personal meditation and group 
discussion. Besides these retreats, days of recollection are offered 
from time to time during the year. 



a 



paaniza tlons 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHORUS 

The Loyola University Chorus is emphasized in the curriculum 
because it offers students an experience in collective performance 
and interpretation. 

UNIVERSITY BAND 

Membership in the University Concert Band is open to the 
students of the College of Music and other University departments 
if they have the required ability and training. 

OPERA WORKSHOP 

The class concentrates on music, text, and stage direction 
simultaneously. In addition to learning the staging of their own 
parts in scenes or complete operas, the students learn general in- 
formation about operatic stage deportment that may be applied to 
any role in the future. The emphasis is placed on opera that is 
good theatre. 

BRASS ENSEMBLE 

The College of Music provides a stimulating program of fine 
literature for brass majors ranging from early Baroque music to 
the m.ost modern compositions. Members of the Brass Ensemble are 



16 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

selected by audition. This select group is featured in the Loyola 
Band concerts and appears frequently in a professional capacity 
with organizations in the city. 

WOODWIND ENSEMBLE 

A program open to woodwind players who have the required 
qualifications. Study and performance of standard and modern 
literature. 

LOYOLA BALLET 

The Loyola Ballet is open to university students who have the 
required training and ability. Rehearsals held on weekends in prep- 
aration for winter performance with Loyola Concert Band. 

PHI BETA 

Phi Beta, National Professional Fraternity of Music and 
Speech, was founded in 1912 at Northwestern University. Epsilon 
Chapter was installed at Loyola University in 1938. 

The purpose of the Fraternity is to promote the b^st in music 
and speech and to develop professional ability in these two arts. 
Marie A. Armbruster, President, 1967-68. 

ALPHA MU 

National Professional Music Therapy Fraternity. Membership 
is open to Music Therapy majors and other students at Loyola who 
are interested in the advancement of Music Therapy. Second se- 
mester freshmen and upper classmen are eligible for membership. 
Alpha Mu is dedicated to the promotion of fraternal spirit among 
students and to the professional advancement of Music Therapy 
through lectures, hospital (institutional) observation and volunteer 
activities in which music students are invited to participate. 

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS 

Students of the College of Music are eligible for membership 
in the Loyola Stage Band, Student Council, Alpha Sigma Nu, Blue 
Key, Alpha Pi Omicron, Lambda Sigma Lambda, Cardinal Key, 
Kappa Delta Pi, and other social fraternities and sororities. 



General hiformation 



17 



c 



oncer 



l6 



As a means of widening the experience of the students, and as 
a cultural contribution to the community, the College of Music 
presents a series of concerts each year. These concerts consist of 
the following: 

Faculty Recitals Choral Concerts 

Faculty Ensembles Student Recitals 

Band Concerts Student Ensembles 

Chamber Music Radio and Television 



^^wardd 



PHI BETA SOPHOMORE AWARD 

An award of fifty dollars, applicable on tuition, is m.ade an- 
nually by the Alumnae Chapter of Phi Beta Fraternity to the soph- 
omore who has achieved the highest average for the sophomore 
year. The remittance will be made at the beginning of the student's 
junior year. 

WERLEIN AWARDS 

These awards are given by Mr. Philip Werlein of the Werlein's 
Music Company to students who have done outstanding work in 
their respective departments. 

MUSIC AWARD 

The Music Award is awarded each year to the outstanding 
graduating senior who in the judgment of the faculty excelled in 
music and scholarship. 

DEAN'S LIST 

Students with the highest average and those who demonstrate 
special interest, cooperation and leadership are placed on the 
Dean's List and are eligible for an award. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Auditions are held in the early part of the year for talented 
students. Scholarships are awarded upon the basis of performance, 
ability and need. 



18 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



L^ourded KypPered 



The College of Music offers four-year courses leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Music with the following as majors: 

Composition Instrumental 

Voice Organ 

Piano Music Therapy 
Piano Pedagogy 

Four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music 
Education with the following as majors: 

Voice Piano Instrumental 



J^ow ^o ^^ppiii 



ADMISSION 

1. Request an application form from the Director of Admis- 
sions. 

2. Applicant must complete and return Part I. 

3. Attach to the application blank an application fee of $10.00 
payable to Loyola University. This fee is neither deductible 
from the tuition nor refundable. 

4. Attach to the application blank a recent photo approxi- 
mately 2" X 2'^ 

HOUSING 

Applicants interested in housing information should contact 
the respective housing officers. No reservations can be made until 
the student has been officially admitted by the Admissions Direc- 
tor. No students admitted on a part-time basis are entitled to hous- 
ing. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

All Applicants must take the Scholastic Aptitude Tests of the 
College Entrance Examination Board and have the results sent 
to the Director of Admissions. 



I 



General hiformation 19 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

The University participates in the Advanced Placement Pro- 
gram in order to enable superior students to follow at Loyola en- 
riched programs in their chosen fields. It is the responsibility 
of applicants who have taken Advanced Placement Courses and 
Examinations to apply for placement and credit in college-level 
courses. 



^^dmiddion IKeaulrernent^ 



If' 



Entering Freshmen and Transfer students must present proper 
credentials as listed below. These must be filed with the Director 
of Admissions no later than one month prior to registration. 

L Entering Freshmen are admitted by graduation from an ap- 
proved high school accompanied by acceptable scores in the 
CEEB tests. They must present the following high school 
units : 

*English _ 4 units 

History, Civics 2 units 

College Preparatory Mathematics 2 units 

**Latin or Modern Foreign Language 2 units 

Science _ 1 unit 

Academic Elective ._. 1 unit 

Other subjects .- .3 units 

IL TroMsfer Students from other accredited colleges or univer- 
sities will be given Advanced Standing at the discretion of 
the Committee on Admissions, provided they have fulfilled 
the high school requirements for admission and in addition 
present a transcript of college credits certified by the proper 
official of all colleges and universities attended, and giving 
statement of honorable withdrawal. Credits presented from 
a non-accredited institution will be accepted rarely, and only 
if the student has made satisfactory grades in his first se- 
mester at Loyola. No transfer student tvill be accepted unless 
he has attained a "C" average for all hours attempted during 
the preceding year at the college from tvhich he transfers, 



20 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

has a general "C" average for all hours attempted previously 
in college, and has no faculty or disciplinary action against 
him. 

III. All students must undergo a physical examination by their 
personal physician prior to entrance. This examination must 
include a physician's certification of vaccination against 
smallpox within the twelve months prior to matriculation. 

IV. All students are required to pay a reservation deposit of $100 
upon official acceptance to the University. (Boarding stu- 
dents must deposit $150.) These deposits are deductible from 
the tuition and room and board but are not refundable. 

One unit in English may be replaced by a unit in Speech or Journalism. 
*'•' These may be waived and supplied by scheduling Elementary Language in 
college. 

CREDENTIALS 

Applicants for admission as freshmen, or with advanced 
standing, must submit official records from all schools and colleges 
attended. These credentials are to be sent directly by the proper 
officer of the school or college in which they were earned and not 
through the student. Credentials which are submitted for admis- 
sion become the property of the University, even in the case of 
applicants to whom admission is denied, and are kept permanently 
on file. 

It is recommended that applicants who desire admission imme- 
diately on graduation from high school have their credentials sent 
to the Director of Admissions at the beginning of the last term of 
their senior year. These credentials should include the past scho- 
lastic record, together with a list of courses in progress during 
the final term of the senior year and the applicant's rank in class. 
This will enable the Committee on Admissions to grant tentative 
admission pending receipt of complete and final records. 

RESTRICTION OF ADMISSIONS 

The University reserves the right to refuse admission to appli- 
cants whose previous work is of such a grade as to create a doubt 
regarding their ability to pursue successfully their scholastic work 
in the University. 



General Information 21 



No student will be admitted on a part time basis in the regular 
Fall and Spring sessions of the academic year. 

Students should be present on the opening day of classes. They 
will not be admitted after the first five class days. Freshmen must 
be present on the opening day of Freshman Orientation Week. 

student C^xpenSed 

All students are required to pay full tuition, fees, etc., at the 
time of registration and on the days assigned. A student has not 
officially completed registration until having properly satisfied his 
financial obligations. If he does not complete his registration dur- 
ing the assigned time, the student must pay a late registration fee. 
Resident students are required to pay room and board on the day 
of registration. 

Tuition for eight complete semesters is required of all students, 
regardless of the numbers of hours taken during any one semester. 
Transfer students, of course, need pay for only those semesters re- 
quired to supplement their transferred credits. 

The University reserves the right to change, with due notice, 
any of the expenses listed and to withhold statements of honorable 
dismissal, grade reports, transcript of record, diploma, etc., until 
all indebtedness to the University has been discharged or until satis- 
factory arrangements have been made with the Vice President for 
Business and Finance. Also, no student will be allowed to register 
subsequently as long as his prior financial indebtedness has not 
been satisfied. Exceptions to regulations regarding University 
charges will be made only by the President of the University. 

Students are encouraged to make payments by check, money 
order, etc., made payable to Loyola University. Cash transactions 
are discouraged. 

SUMMARY OF ANNUAL EXPENSE REQUIREMENTS 

General Expenses 

Application Fee (not refundable) _...$ 10.00 

Acceptance Deposit (not refundable, but applicable 

to First Semester Tuition) 100.00 



22 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

Tuition — Payable Semi-annually 1,400.00 

Part-time — regular students (per semester hr.) .._. 50.00 

Part-time — accredited teachers (per semester hr.) 40,00 

Part-time — religious (per semester hr.) ._ 30.00 

Student Center Fee ...._ _ 20.00 

Room Guarantee Deposit (not refundable but applicable 

to Student Room and Board) 50.00 

Room and Board (per academic year) 

Men (range) $ 850.00-$ 950.00 

Women (range)..... 1,010.00- 1,260.00 

Cofitingent Fees 

Late Registration Fee $ 20.00 

Registration Fee for degree only (per semester) 25.00 

Subject Change Fee (per course) 5.00 

Late Examination Fee 10.00 

Additional Transcript Fee 2.00 

ROTC deposit (refundable) 25.00 

Resident Students (damage, breakage and 

key deposit — refundable) 25.00 

Student Health Insurance .-. 23.00* 

*( Subject to change due to loss experience.) 

Fees for Seniors 

Graduation Fee $ 25.00 

Cap and Gown deposit and rental 30.00 

The Late Examination Fee will be charged for any examination 
taken later than the assigned date, no matter what the excuse. No 
late examination will be given without the written permission of 
the Dean. 

The Transcript Fee. For all transcripts sent after the first one 
there is a $2.00 fee. HoM^ever, when a student requests more than 
five transcripts at one time he is charged $2.00 for the first copy 
and fifty cents for each additional one. 

The Graduation Fee and Cap and Goivn Deposit are paid on the 
date designated by the Finance Office. Provided the cap and gown 
are returned in good condition immediately after graduation $25.00 
will be refunded. If they are returned later than one month after 
graduation only $10.00 will be refunded. 



General Information 23 



The Student Center Fee. A student center fee of $20.00 is assessed 
all students carrying 12 or more hours. 

TUITION PLAN— MONTHLY PAYMENTS 

Students are strongly urged to subscribe to the Tuition Plan, 
a special convenience offered to those who prefer to pay the tuition 
in equal monthly installments. The following plans are optional 
and available at the cost indicated. 

One Year Plan ( 8 payments) 4% more than Cash Price 

Two Year Plan (20 payments) 5% more than Cash Price 

Three Year Plan (30 payments) 6 % more than Cash Price 
Four Year Plan (40 payments) 6% more than Cash Price 

The two, three and four year plans include Parent Life Insur- 
ance for qualified parents. This insurance coverage provides funds 
for the cost of the remaining period of schooling covered by the 
contract, if the parent who has signed the contract dies. A descrip- 
tive pamphlet will be sent upon request from the Director of Ad- 
missions. 

REFUND POLICY 

It is the duty of the student, in case of official withdrawal 
from the College, to apply to the Finance Office for refund of 
tuition. Refunds are made on the following basis : Within first 
week of semester — 80 % ; one to three weeks of semester — 60 % ; 
three to five weeks of semester — 40 % ; no refund after five weeks. 

No refunds are made when a student is suspended or dismissed 
for academic or disciplinary reasons. 

Special consideration regarding refunds will be given to stu- 
dents either voluntarily entering the Armed Services or being 
drafted. 

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS 

The President's Scholarship (Available to all Jesuit High 
Schools). This scholarship is awarded by the President of the 
University to the student graduating first in his class. It is a full 
tuition scholarship. 

WORK SCHOLARSHIPS 

It is possible to defray a portion of the tuition costs through 
performance of on-campus work for a specified number of hours 



24 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

a week in the various departments of the University. These jobs 
are limited and are not given out until after the Fall Semester is 
in session. 

Work-Study Program 

This is an on-campus employment program supported jointly 
by the University and the Federal Government. Eligibility is 
based on financial need. These jobs are limited and are not given 
out until after the Fall Semester is in session. 



LOANS 

Louisiana Higher Education Assistance Loan 

The State of Louisiana will agree to guarantee loans negotiated 
between specific banks and college students who are legal residents 
of Louisiana. The loan is limited to $1,000 per year and a $5,000 
aggregate. Interest is paid by the state while the student is still 
in school. The interest is 6%, 3% of which will be paid by the 
Federal Government if the family's adjusted income is less than 
$15,000. 

National Defense Student Loan Program 

This program has been instituted by the Federal Government 
for the purpose of making long term, low-interest loans to qualified 
students. The m.aximum amount a student may borrow is $1,000 
in an academic year and the total is limited to $5,000. The amount 
borrowed is determined by the University. The loan begins to 
accrue 3% interest nine months after the student leaves school. 
The loan matures ten years after this termination. 

U.S. Loan Program for Cuban Refugees 

This is a program, limited to students who cannot get help 
from home for their education in the United States. Three per cent 
on this loan begins one calendar year after cessation of enrollment 
in the University, the loan reaching maturity in ten years. 

Out-of-State-Loans 

Most states have state loan programs for residents of their 
state. Some are handled by the state agency and some are handled 



General Information 25 



by private agencies for the state. Students interested in these 
loans should check with their State Office of Education or their 
local bank. 

Educational Opportunity Grants 

Grants are given under this program by the Federal Govern- 
ment to a limited number of undergraduates with exceptional fi- 
nancial need. The grants range from $200 to $800 per year and 
must be matched by funds from a loan, scholarship, or student 
assistantship. 



student ^J^oudina 



POLICY FOR OUT OF TOWN STUDENTS 

Full time undergraduate men and women students under 23 
years of age are required to reside in University housing. Requests 
for information should be directed by men to the Director of Men's 
Housing and by wom.en to the Directress of Women's Housing. 

RESERVATIONS 

The step toward a reservation is to return all information re- 
quested by the Admissions Office. Eligible students are notified by 
the Director of Admissions that $150 deposit will be required for 
reservations. Fifty dollars of this deposit applies to the student's 
housing charges and is not refundable if the student cancels his 
housing. The student must have a signed contract along with all 
required housing forms, i.e., a medical release form, before his 
housing reservation will be honored. 

UNDERGRADUATE MEN 

Biever Hall is a six story dormitory on the north side of the 
campus. This structure is completely air conditioned and centrally 
heated and houses 410, Rooms are for double occupancy and are 
equipped with a phone. Each student has a private locker, single 
bed, chest of drawers, and desk. A laundry pick-up station which 
also dry cleans is housed on the ground level. Mail boxes and wash- 
ing and drying facilities are also provided. Jesuit priests are avail- 



26 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

able for counseling. All supervision is under the Head Resident 
and his assistants who are student monitors. 

OTHER STUDENT HOUSING 

The University maintains other residences. Rooms are single 
or double. Laundry, social and recreational facilities are housed 
in each hall. 

CONTRACT MEALS 

Both men and women residents must contract for room and 
board. Students eat the meals included on their meal contract 
calendar in a special contract dining room of Danna Center. The 
meal contract charges exclude holidays. 

WOMEN 

Buddig Hall is a twelve story dormitory for women on campus. 
Capacity of this dormitory is 429. Each suite has individual con- 
trols for central heat and air conditioning. These suites house 
two rooms sharing bath facilities. Each room has its private wash 
basin and cosmetic stands, 2 single beds, 2 desks, 2 chest of drawers, 
a bulletin board, book shelves, and a phone. Laundry facilities 
with washers and dryers are located on the ground floor. A linen 
and dry cleaning pickup rental station plus many other con- 
veniences are housed in the building. A limited number of single 
room.s are available with private bath facilities. Cost will vary 
with accommodations received. 

COST 

Students residing on campus are on a room and board plan. 
Charges, therefore, cover room and board and are due on a semes- 
ter basis at the time of registration. Charges may vary with de- 
sired accommodations and services or availability of housing facili- 
ties. 

Men: $ 850- 950 per year (Sept.-May) 

Women $1,010-1,260 per year (Sept.-May) 

The above cost does not include cost of the University Health 
Insurance program (required of all full time students if not 
waived), nor the $25 deposit for damage and the $2 key deposit. 
Room charges exclude Christmas holidays as per the University 



General Information 27 



calendar. The University will utilize rooms for guests and special 
seminars during the Christmas holidays. 

The $25 deposit for damage and the $2 key deposit is payable 
at the time of occupancy. This deposit will be retained by the 
Finance Office and drawn upon by the housing office when neces- 
sary. The full amount of the deposit or the balance will be refunded 
when the student officially withdraws or graduates. 

The $50 room deposit sent through the Admissions Office is 
credited to the student's room and board charges. It is not refund- 
able if the student cancels his housing request. 



28 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



^y^dmlnidti'atiue f rocedi 



are 



KNOWLEDGE OF REGULATIONS 

Every student is to acquaint himself with all the regulations of 
the University that pertain to him. Ignorance of a regulation is 
not accepted as an excuse for its violation. These regulations are 
to be learned from the Student Handbook, official instructions 
given to the students, and posted official notices. When a student 
registers in the University, it is understood that both the student 
and the student's parents or guardians agree to the student being 
governed by the regulations of the University, and will abide by 
decisions that may be made by officials of the University regard- 
ing the student. 

INSTRUCTION 

The unit of instruction is one hour a week for one semester. 
Two hours of work in a laboratory are considered equivalent to 
one hour of class work. Students may receive credit only for the 
number of hours published for a course. 

ATTENDANCE 

The University is insistent on regular and punctual attendance. 
Each tardiness, defined as a student's failure to be present when 
his name is called at the beginning of each class or laboratory, will 
be counted as a third of an absence. 

The student coming late is responsible for seeing that the in- 
structor changes the absence noted at the beginning of the class 
to a tardiness. 

Any student incurring more than six absences in a course which 
carries three or more semester hours will be dropped from the 
course automatically. In courses of less than three semester hours 
the maximum number of absences will be double the number of 
semester hours, e.g. in a two semester hour course, four absences 
will be the maximum allowed; in a one semester hour course, two 
absences will be the maximum. 

Double cuts should be registered before and after the major 
holidays only, viz., Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mardi Gras, and Eas- 



General hi formation 29 



ter. Double cuts should be registered only on the last University 
class day before the beginning of the holidays and the first Univer- 
sity class day after the holidays. For example, if the holidays 
begin on Friday, the last class day being Thursday, a student would 
not incur double cuts on Wednesday, even if his last classes before 
the holidays were on Wednesday. Similarly, if University classes 
are resumed on Thursday, when a student would have no classes 
scheduled, and he skips scheduled classes on Friday, double cuts 
would not be incurred on Friday. 

Students who have exceeded the maximum number of absences 
will have a right to petition the Committee on Attendance for re- 
instatement. 

Students petitioning reinstatement should do so within twenty- 
four hours after they receive notification that they have been 
dropped from a course. The petition must be submitted by letter to 
the Dean and m.ust include the reason for each absence, giving 
dates, etc. While the petition is being reviewed by the Committee 
on Attendance the student will be permitted to attend class. The 
decision of the Committee on Attendance will be final. Extended 
absences due to sickness must be verified by a doctor's certificate. 

Students entering class more than five minutes after the start- 
ing bell will be recorded absent. 

Absences for any excuse whatever do not exempt a student 
from quizzes, tests, examinations, or other written work required 
during the period of absence. The responsibility for making up 
such work rests wholly upon the student. A failing grade for the 
omitted work will be charged against the student if he does not 
fulfill his obligations within the time limit determined by his pro- 
fessors. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE OF HONOR STUDENTS 

All undergraduate Juniors and Seniors in the College of Arts 
and Sciences with a 3.5 average or higher for a semester are al- 
lowed unlimited cuts in all their subjects, laboratories excluded, 
for the following semester. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

A student who withdraws from the University during a semes- 
ter before taking the final examinations of the semester forfeits 
all credit for work done in that semester. 



30 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

To withdraw officially from the University a student must : 

1. Obtain withdrawal forms from the Office of the Registrar. 

2. Obtain signatures of designated officials on withdrawal 
forms. (These forms will not be signed until the student 
has cleared all obligations to the University.) 

3. Resident students must officially withdraw by obtaining 
clearance through the Housing Office. 

Withdrawal is not complete or official until all signatures have 
been obtained and forms are returned to the Office of the Regis- 
trar. 

Those students who withdraw officially from the University 
prior to mid-semester examinations will not have grades recorded 
in those courses for which they were registered at the time of with- 
drawal. 

All students who withdraw officially from the University after 
the mid-semester examinations will be assigned a grade for each 
course for which they were registered at the time of withdrawal. 
If the grade is passing at the tim.e of withdrawal a grade of WP 
will be assigned. If the grade is failing, a grade of WF will be 
assigned which shall indicate a failure in the course. 

THOSE STUDENTS FAILING TO COMPLETE OFFICIAL 
WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY WILL INCUR A 
GRADE OF "WF" IN ALL COURSES FOR WHICH THEY ARE 
REGISTERED. THESE GRADES ARE PLACED ON THE STU- 
DENT'S PERMANENT RECORD AND ARE NOT SUBJECT 
TO CHANGE. STUDENTS ARE REMINDED THAT THEY 
MUST COMPLETE OFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL FROM THE 
UNIVERSITY BEFORE THE TERMINATION OF THE SE- 
MESTER IN WHICH THEY ARE REGISTERED. 

In the case of a student who is called to active duty in any 
branch of the armed services before the date for final examina- 
tions in the semester, the following exceptions to the formal regu- 
lations have been made : 

1. Should a second semester senior be called to military service 
within six tveeks of the date of commencement exercises, he will 
have the dates of his final examinations advanced, and, if he 
passes successfully, he will be granted full credit and his de- 
gree. 



General Information 31 



2. A senior in his first semester, or a junior, sophomore, or fresh- 
man in either semester luho is called into military service ivith- 
in four weeks of the end of the semester tvill have his examina- 
tion dates advanced, and, if he passes successfully, be granted 
full credit for the semester. 

3. A notation of the action taken by the University in accordance 
with the provisions made above will be made on the records and 
transcripts of the students who have received full credit mider 
these provisions. 

SCHEDULE CHANGES 

A student desiring to drop a scheduled course or to add another 
course after his semester's schedule has been filed in the Registrar's 
Office should consult with his Adviser or the Chairman of the De- 
partment in which he is registered from whom he should obtain 
written permission to revise his schedule. This written permission 
should be presented by the student to the Dean for approval. Per- 
mission to add a course or change from one section to another will 
not be granted after the date indicated in the Session Calendar as 
the last day for schedule adjustments. 

Students remaining in the University who drop one or more 
courses after the date indicated in the Session Calendar as the last 
day for schedule adjustments must be assigned a grade. If the 
grade is passing at the time the course is dropped a grade of WP 
will be assigned. If the grade is failing a WF will be assigned 
which will indicate a failure in the course. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Those students are ranked as Sophomores who have credit for 
twenty-four semester hours ; Juniors, those who have fifty-six 
sem^ester hours ; Seniors, those who have ninety-two semester 
hours. Students not included in any of these classifications are 
registered either as special students or as out-of-course students. 

GRADES AND REPORTS 

A report of the semester grades made by a student in his 
scheduled subjects is sent to the student at the middle and end of 



32 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

each semester. Grades are reported as follows : 

A (93-100) excellent; B (85-92) very good; C (77-84) good; D 
(70-76) merely passing; F (0-69) failed; W withdrawal from 
subject course with permission ; WF, withdrawal with failing 
grade or failure because of excessive absences ; WP, withdrawal 
with passing grade ; I, incomplete grade. 

All incomplete grades must be removed before the end of the 
following semester. Otherwise, they become failures and are so 
recorded. However, it is more beneficial to the student if the in- 
com.plete grade is removed before the middle of the following se- 
mester in order that an undue burden is not placed on the student 
when preparing for his scheduled final examinations. 

Semester grades are determined as follows: 

Pre-examination work in first half of semester 40% 

Pre-examination work in second half of semester 20% 

Final Examination .-- -- — 40% 

QUALITY POINT RATING 

No student will be permitted to graduate unless he has estab- 
lished a quality point average of 2.0 in his work towards the de- 
sired degree. 

N. B. The quality point average is determined by dividing the 
total of quality points earned by the total hours attempted. 

Qualitj^ points are earned in the following manner: for the 
grade of "A", in a subject course, the student is credited with four 
times as many quality points as semester hours allowed for that 
course ; for the grade of "B," three times as many quality points 
as semester hours ; for the grade of "C," twice as many quality 
points as semester hours ; for the grade of "D," the same number 
of quality points as semester hours ; for the grade of "F," no qual- 
ity points are merited. 

REPETITION OF COURSES 

A student who has failed a course will be allowed to repeat 
that course when it is next offered. No more than two repetitions 
of the same course will be allowed to any student. 

With the special permission of the Dean, a student may repeat 
a course already successfully completed with a grade of "C" or 



General Infor^nation 33 



"D" in order to better the quality of his work. No third attempt 
will be allowed. Courses in which a grade of "B" has been earned 
may not be repeated. In computing the student's general average 
and quality point average in the major field, all attempts will be 
counted. In computing the quality point average in the minor fields, 
only the higher grade will be counted in the case of courses which 
have been repeated. 

DEAN'S LIST 

All students achieving a quality point average of 3.5 or higher 
in a semester merit the distinction, Honors, and are eligible for the 
Dean's List. Those students who maintain this average for both 
semesters of the academic year are presented an award at the 
Honors Convocation in the Fall Semester. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 

1. In order that students maintain the required academic 
standing and continue in course, the following minimum standards 
must be met: 

a) a quality point average of 1.7 for the first semester 

b) a total quality point average of 2.0 for the second semester 

c) a total quality point average of 2.0 after the second semester 
and every subsequent semester. 

Students failing to meet these specified requirements will be 
placed on probation for one semester. If a student is unable to 
raise his quality point average to the required minimum after one 
semester of probation, he will be subject to dismissal from the 
College. 

Only rarely and for very grave reasons will the probation of a 
student be executed beyond one semester. 

2. Students who have not established a 2.0 general average and 
a 2.0 average in their major and minor fields of concentration at 
the end of their sophomore year must remedy their deficiences 
before beginning their upper division major or minor work. 

3. Students on scholastic probation will schedule no more than 
16 and no less than 12 semester hours. 



34 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

STUDENT CONDUCT 

The educational system of this University includes, as one of 
its most important features, the formation of character. It is ex- 
pected that each student will be so loyal to the spirit and ideals of 
the University that the exercise of proper self-control will come 
from his own convictions and free determination. 

It is intended that the college regulations be a guide and help 
to foster the conduct which is presupposed in every Loyola student. 
The College requires regular and punctual attendance at all sched- 
uled exercises, observance of college customs and regulations, 
serious application to study, and exemplary demeanor in all college 
activities. A student who is deficient in these essential points will 
be suspended or dismissed. 

The University reserves the right to dismiss at any time a stu- 
dent who fails to give satisfactory evidence of earnestness of pur- 
pose and of interest in the serious work of college life. In rare cases 
a student may be dismissed for a reason that seem.s to students and 
parents to be insufficient. In such cases the University is to be con- 
sidered the more capable judge of what affects the interest both of 
the institution and of the student body. 

Students will be taxed for excessive breakage or destruction of 
University property. The decision covering each case will be made 
by the University. 

PERMISSION TO TAKE COURSES AT OTHER UNIVERSITES 

Students who wish to schedule courses at other colleges and 
have such courses recognized as partial fulfillment of their Degree 
Program at Loyola must obtain the written permission of the Dean 
before such courses are scheduled. 

Failure to obtain such written permission ivill render the 
courses unacceptable to Loyola. Courses in which a grade of "D" 
is earned will not be accepted as transfer credit. 

TEACHERS EDUCATION AND CERTIFICATION 

No student will be certified to teach in elementary or secondary 
schools unless the student fulfills all the requirements of the 
teacher education curriculum and a degree has been conferred in 
one of the following teaching fields: Bachelor of Science in Ele- 



General InforwMtion 35 



mentary Education, Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education, 
or Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. 

Student teaching for one semester must be completed under the 
supervision of the Department of Education of Loyola University. 

student y^raanizailond 
STUDENT COUNCIL 

The Student Council consists of thiry-seven members, repre- 
senting the College of Arts and Sciences, the Schools of Law and 
Dentistry, the College of Music, Business Administration and the 
Evening Division. These students are selected by the student body 
with the approval of Dean of Students. The Council serves to 
unify student thought and action. It conducts general meetings 
and elections, sponsors and manages interclass contests and leads 
and directs student activities. 

STUDENT UNION 

The Student Union consists of over 175 selected students whose 
purpose is to promote and coordinate the various activities in the 
University's Danna Center. The Student Union supplements and 
implements the academic curriculum of the University by fulfilling 
its three main programming functions : social, cultural and recrea- 
tional. Eight committees, in addition to the five officers of the 
Union comprise the Student Union Governing Board. The Com- 
mittees are Fine Arts, Current Events, Dance- and Entertainment, 
Hospitality, Personnel, Student-Faculty Relations Board. 

HONORARY FRATERNITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

In order to give recognition and encouragement to high stan- 
dards of scholarship among the students, several honorary schol- 
astic fraternities and organizations have been established on the 
campus. 

Alpha Sigma Nu 

Membership in Alpha Sigma Nu, national honorary Jesuit 
scholastic society, is the greatest honor which can be bestowed 
upon undergraduate male students of the University who have 



36 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

distinguished themselves by scholastic achievement. Sole honor 
group set aside for that purpose on the campus, the Loyola Chapter 
was established April 26, 1936. The two highest ranking students 
in each school or college of the University are nominated for mem- 
bership each year. Final selection is made from their number. 

Blue Key 

Blue Key is a national honorary service fraternity whose 
members are chosen by the active student chapter from male 
students who have distinguished themselves in leadership activity, 
scholarship and service rendered the University. The Loyola chap- 
ter was founded September 14, 1931. 

Cardinal Key 

Cardinal Key national honor sorority was established in 1953. 
Election to the sorority is the recognition of achievement by a 
Loyola co-ed in scholarship and extra-curricular activity. The 
organization seeks to advance religion, patriotism, and service by 
affording training for leadership in the college community. 

Kappa Delta Pi 

Kappa Delta Pi is an honor society in education to encourage 
high professional, intellectual, and personal standards and to rec- 
ognize outstanding contributions in education. Zeta Rho Chapter, 
established at Loyola on October 8, 1949, taps those undergraduates 
who achieve a quality point average of 3.3 and graduate students 
who earn a quality point average of 3.5. Kappa Delta Pi has its 
journal. The Educational Forum, which is one of the leading 
scholarly journals in education. 



I roaramS of ^tudu 



(/bachelor ojf lllHusl 



UdLC 



38 



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Description of Courses 51 



.-Applied ffludlc 

Guy F. Bernard, Chairman 



PIANO 

General Information 

The piano department of Loyola University is designed to 
meet the needs of students in several areas of study. Students v^ho 
qualify may elect to v^ork toward the Bachelor of Music degree 
with a major in piano or piano pedagogy. Other degrees which may 
have an emphasis on piano are the Bachelor of Music Education 
and the Bachelor of Music in Music Therapy. Students enrolled 
in other degree programs in the College of Music are required to 
have a basic knowledge of the piano. In addition, the department 
is designed to meet the needs of students from other departments 
of the University who wish to take piano for cultural reasons. 

Entrance Requirements 

To enter the four-year degree course in Piano, Piano Peda- 
gogy, Music Education or Music Therapy, the student should be 
grounded in reliable technique. He should play all major and minor 
scales correctly in moderately rapid tempo, also broken chords in 
octave position in all keys and should have acquired systematic 
methods of practice. 

Departmental Examinations 

Examinations are held at the end of each semester for all 
students enrolled in the piano department. Grades are dependent 
upon performance and the amount of prescribed material learned. 

Special Examinations 

Entrance examinations are given to all freshmen and transfer 
students enrolling in the piano department. Students enrolled in 
the Bachelor of Music degree program as piano majors must pass 
a formal faculty jury examination toward the end of the Sopho- 
more year. At this time the faculty will decide whether or not 
such students posses the capabilities to continue as piano majors. 



52 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



Accompaniment 

Students having majors in Piano or Piano Pedagogy, or having 
major emphasis in piano in the Music Education or Music Therapy 
programs, are required to accompany in the instrum.ental or vocal 
department for a period of at least one hour per week. 

Description of Courses 

Mu 001-2 PREPARATORY PIANO— Designed for students who do not meet 
the entrance requirements for Mu 127 or by beginning piano students from 
other departments of the University. no credit 

Mu 127-8 PIANO (Minor) — Students taking degree programs in the College 
of Music which require a minor in piano should elect this course. 

1 hours per semester 

Mu 127-8 FRESHMAN PIANO— For Music Education and Music Therapy 
majors whose major instrument is piano. Bach, Two Part Inventions; 
Czerny, Op. 299 or equivalent; Sonatas equivalent in difficulty to Beethoven 
Op. 49, No. 1 or the easier Haydn and Mozart sonatas; romantic and modern 
pieces; major and minor scales, broken chords in all keys. 

3 hours per semester 

Mu 127-8 FRESHMAN PIANO— For Piano Pedagogy majors. Bach, Two 
Part Inventions; Czerny Op. 299 or equivalent; sonatas equivalent in dif- 
ficulty to Beethoven, Op. 49, No. 1 or the easier Haydn and Mozart sonatas; 
romantic and modern pieces; major scales, broken chords in all keys. 

^ hours per semester 

Mu 127-8 FRESHMAN PIANO— For Piano majors. Bach. Two Part Inven- 
tions; Czerny, Op. 299 or equivalent; sonatas equivalent in difficulty to 
Beethoven, Op. 49, No. 1 or the easier Haydn and Mozart sonatas; romantic 
and modern pieces; major and minor scales, broken chords in all keys. 

Jf. hours per sem,ester 

Mu 227-8 PIANO (Minor) — Continuation of MU 127-8. 1 hour per semester 

Mu 227-8 SOPHOMORE PIANO— Continuation of Mu 127-8. Bach, Three 
Part Inventions; Clementi, Gradus ad Parnassum or equivalent; Sonatas 
equivalent in difficulty to the more advanced Haydn and Mozart sonatas or 
Beethoven, Op. 26; romantic and modern pieces; scales, parallel and contrary 
motion in thirds, sixths and tenths; arpegii. 3 hours per semester 

Mu 227-8 SOPHOMORE PIANO— Continuation of Mu 127-8. Bach, Three 
Part Inventions; Clementi Gradus and Parnassum or equivalent; sonatas 
equivalent in difficulty to the more advanced Haydn or Mozart sonatas or 
Beethoven, Op. 26; romantic and modern pieces scales, parallel and contrary 
motion in thirds, sixths and tenths; arpegii. 4 hours per sem,ester 

Mu 227-8 SOPHOMORE PIANO— Continuance of Mu 127-8. Bach, Three 
Part Inventions; Clementi, Gradus ad Parnassum or equivalent; sonatas 
equivalent in difficulty to the more advanced Haydn and Mozart sonatas or 
Beethoven, Op. 26; romantic and modern pieces; scales, parallel and contrary 
motion in thirds, sixths and tenths; arpegii. 4 hours per semester 



Description of Courses 53 



Mu 327-8 JUNIOR PIANO— Continuation of Mu 227-8. Bach, Preludes and 
Fugues from the Well-Tempered Clavier, English and French Suites; de- 
menti, Grdus ad Parnassum or equivalent; sonatas equivalent in difficulty 
to Beethoven, Op. 31, No. 2; romantic and modern pieces. 

3 hours per semester 

Mu 327-8 JUNIOR PIANO— Continuation of Mu 227-8. Bach, Preludes and 
Fugues from the Well-Tempered Clavier, English and Franch Suites; de- 
menti, Gradus ad Parnassum or equivalent; sonatas equivalent in difficulty 
to Beethoven, Op. 31, No. 2; romantic and modern pieces. 

4 pieces per semester 

Mu 327-8 JUNIOR PIANO— Continuation of Mu 227-8. Bach, Preludes and 
Fugues from the Well-Tempered Clavier, English and Franch Suites; de- 
menti, Gradus ad Parnassum or equivalent; sonatas equivalent in difficulty 
to Beethoven, Op. 31, No. 2; romantic and modern pieces; one complete con- 
certo. Students electing this course are required to play a solo recital or a 
recital in conjunction with another student. 4 hours per seviester 

Mu 377 PIANO LITERATURE SEMINAR— A study of the keyboard works 
of the Johann Sebastian Bach, with stylistic and formal analysis. 

1 sernester hour 

Mu 378 PIANO LITERATURE SEMINAR— A study of the keyboard works 
of Haydn Mozart and Beethoven, with special emphasis on form. 

1 semester hour 

Mu 381-2 ACCOMPANIMENT— Students are taught the principles of ac- 
companying instrumental and vocal music. Training in sight-reading is an 
integral part of the course. Students are assigned to serve as accompanists. 

1 hour per semester 

Mu 427-8 SENIOR PIANO— Continuation of Mu 327-8. Bach, Chromatic Fan- 
tasy and Fugue, Toccatas, or equivalent; Ttudes by Chopin, Liszt or 
Brahms; sonatas equivalent in difficulty to Beethoven, Op. 53; one complete 
concerto; romantic and modern pieces; scales in double thirds and octaves. A 
partial recital is required for graduation. 3 hours per semester 

Mu 427-8 SENIOR PIANO— Continuation of Mu 327-8. Bach, Chromatic Fan- 
tasy and Fugue, Toccatas, or equivalent; Etudes by Chopin, Liszt or 
Brahms; sonatas equivalent in difficulty to Beethoven, Op. 53; romantic and 
modern pieces; one complete concerto; scales in double thirds and octaves. 
A partial recital is required for graduation. 4 hours per semester 

Mu 427-8 SENIOR PIANO— Continuation of Mu 327-8. Bach, Chomatic Fan- 
tasy and Fugue, Toccatas, or equivalent; Etudes by Chopin, Liszt or 
Brahms; sonatas equivalent in difficulty to Brahms, Sonata in F minor; 
romantic and modern pieces; one complete concerto; scales in double thirds 
and octaves. A full recital is required for graduation. 4- hours per semester 

Mu 477 PIANO LITERATURE SEMINAR— A study of the piano works of 
the romantic period with emphasis on stylistic and formal comparison with 
the classical period. 1 semester hour 

Mu 478 PIANO LITERATURE SEMINAR— A study of major 20th century 
compositions for piano, with attention to the different schools of composition. 

1 semester hour 



54 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



Mu 481-2 ACCOMPANIMENT— Continuation of Mu 381-2. 

1 hour per semester 

Mu 389-90 PEDAGOGY AND MATERIALS— Instruction in private and 
class piano teaching, methods and materials, required of all piano majors. 

1 hour per semester 

Mu 489-90 PEDAGOGY PRACTICE— Actual practice teaching guided by the 
instructor; required of pedagogy majors. Prerequisite; Mu 389-90, or the 
approval of the instructor. 1 hour per semester 



VOICE 

Entrance Requirements 

To enter the four year degree course in voice, the student 
should be able to sing standard songs and the simpler classics in 
good English, on pitch, with correct phrasing and musical intelli- 
gence. He should be able to demonstrate his ability to read a 
simple song at sight, and have a knowledge of the rudiments of 
music. Some knowledge of piano is required. Entrance examina- 
tions are required. 

FIRST YEAR REQUIREMENTS 

Vocalization (Technique books used — Abt I, II, III, Sieber) 
Beginning vocal production, breath control, tone quality. Use of 
Old Italian Songs (16th and 17th century). Eary English classical 
(Handel, Mozart, Haydn). 

Board Requirements — Based on ability to vocalize, such as 
scales, arpeggii, etc. One Old Italian song to demonstrate Italian 
diction; one Old English or Folk Song (Bergerette, English or 
Italian) . 

Repertoire Books — Italian Anthology, Young Singer, 56 Songs. 
Pathways of Song. Old English Songs arranged by Lane Wilson. 

SECOND YEAR REQUIREMENTS 

Vocalization continued, adding sustaining tones, agility, chro- 
matics, ennunciation, pronunciation of Italian and English diction, 
classic vocal embellishments, dynamics, interpretation. (Technique 
books used : Lutgen, Vaccai) . 

Board Requirements — Demonstrate ability of singing chro- 
matic scale, double arpeggii, 6 songs for majors in Old Italian, 



Description of Courses 55 



English and French, 4 songs for minors in Old Italian, English and 
French. One song will be the student's choice. One will be selected 
by the Board. 

Repertoire Books — Old Italian Anthology, 56 songs or compa- 
rable songs. Albums, Modern French anthology. Collections of 
Faure, Duparc, Hahn Massenet, Auber, Operatic and Oratorio 
Anthology. 

A repertoire book of m.aterial learned for the semester is requir- 
ed by the board for each semester. 

THIRD YEAR REQUIREMENTS 

Vocalization continued (Panofka, Marchesi) 

Board Requirements — Same as in the second year with the 
addition of German Leider (Schubert, Schumann, Brahms). Con- 
tinued study of Franch as in the second year adding Debussy, 
Ravel, Chausson, Liszt, Chabrier. All majors are required to give 
a Junior Recital consisting of eight songs. (Eight songs for Majors 
in Old Italian, French, English, German. Six songs for Minors in 
Old Italian, French, English, German). 

FOURTH YEAR REQUIREMENTS 

Vocalization continued (Panofka, Marchesi). A sufficient 
study of the piano is necessary so that accompaniments of average 
difficulty can be played. The candidate for graduation should 
demonstrate the ability to sing in four languages, knowledge of the 
general song literature. 

Board Requirements — Twelve songs for Majors in all lan- 
guages, eight songs for Minors in all languages. All Majors are 
required to give a Senior Recital consisting of sixteen songs. 



VIOLIN 

Entrance Requirements 

To enter the four-year degree course in violin the student 
should have an elementary knowledge of the piano-forte. 

He should have the ability to perform etudes of the difficulty 



56 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

of the Kreutzer Etudes, Nos. 1 to 32, and works of the difficulty 
of the Viotti Concerto, No. 23, the de Beriot concerti, Nos. 7 and 9, 
and the Tartini G minor sonata. 

END OF SECOND YEAR 

At the end of the second year the student should have acquired 
the ability to perform works of the difficulty of the Viotti Concerto 
No. 22, the Spohr Concerto No. 2 anl the easier Bach sonatas for 
violin and piano. 

The student should also give evidence of his ability to read at 
sight compositions of moderate difficulty, and should demonstrate 
sufficient ability in ensemble to take part in the performance of 
easier string quartets and symphonic works. He should have ac- 
quired pianistic ability to play simple accompaniments. 

END OF FOURTH YEAR 

At the end of the fourth year the candidate for graduation 
should show an adequate technical grounding in scales, arpegii, 
bowing and phrasing and the ability to perform works of the 
difficulty of the Mendelssohn E minor concerto, the Bruch G 
minor or Spohr No. 8. 

During the four-year coruse the student should have had not 
less than two years practical orchestral experience and two years 
of ensemble. 

He should have studied the viola sufficiently to enable him to 
play in ensembles. 

He should further demonstrate adequate ability in sight read- 
ing and should be able to sight-read simple piano accompaniments. 



STRINGS 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 



The entrance requirements for students of violoncello, viola, 
bass and harp stipulate the same degree of knowledge of the 
pianoforte as in the violin course. The student should also have 
acquired the elementary technique of his instrument. 



Description of Courses 57 



END OF SECOND YEAR 

At the end of the second year the student should have acquired 
sufficient orchestral routine to fill satisfactorily a second desk 
position in symphonic works of lesser difficulty. 

He should have acquired sufficient pianistic ability to be able 
to play simple accompaniments. 

END OF FOURTH YEAR 

At the end of the fourth year the candidate for graduation 
should demonstrate a well grounded technique and an able control 
of his instrument. He should be able to appear successfully as 
soloist with orchestra in a concerto or concert piece for his instru- 
ment. He should have acquired through orchestral routine suffi- 
cient ability to enable him to hold a first desk position in a profes- 
sional orchestra. He should also be able to read at sight simple 
piano music. 

The student should have completed during his course, four 
years of orchestral training and a minimum of two years training 
in the performance of chamber music. 



WOODWINDS 
Flute 

FRESHMAN— Anderson, Etudes, Opus 33 and 30 ; Barrere, The 
Flutist's Form.ulae ; Boehm, 24 Caprices, Opus 26 ; sonatas by Bach 
and Handel. 

Technic — Long tones, attacks; major, minor and whole tone scales; 
broken chords and arpeggios ; scales in all the articulated forms. 

SOPHOMORE— Anderson, Etudes, Opus 63 and 15; Kuhlau, Six 
Divertissements, Opus 68; Mozart, Concertos in D and G Major; 
Bach, Sonatas. 

Technic — Exercises in chromatics, trills, and tremolos. 

JUNIOR — Studies from Bach ; memorization of the more difficult 
etudes by Anderson; Paris Conservatory contest pieces; all 
Kuhlau duets; Jeanjean, Sixteen Studies in the Modern style; 
study of orchestral solo passages; pieces for solo flute. 



58 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

SENIOR — study of the modern flute solos ; review of all the work 
done in the preceding three years; memorization of the solos in 
the orchestral repertory ; Karg-Elert, 30 Caprices, Opus 107 ; en- 
semble playing duets, trios, and quartets. 

Technic — Long tones executed in different intensities, Andersen, 
Virtuoso Studies, Opus 60 ; Strauss, Orchestra Studies ; studies 
from the works of Moyse. 



Oboe 

FRESHMAN — Review of basic exercises of previous grades; Bar- 
ret, ProgressiveExercises ; Bleuzet, Technique of the Oboe, Vols. 
I, II, and III ; Schum.ann, Romances. 

Technic — All scales. 

SOPHOMORE— Barret, Grand Studies or Andraud, Vade Mecum; 
Bleuzet, Technique of the Oboe, Vols. I, II, and III ; Handel, Sona- 
tas. 

Technic — Scales in thirds ; measured trills. 

JUNIOR — Advanced exercises from Andraud, Vade Mecum; sight- 
reading ; Paris Conservatory solos ; orchestral studies ; Mozart and 
Handel, solos ; Bleuzet, Technique of the Oboe, Vols. I, II, and III. 

SENIOR — Gillet, Studies; Mozart, Quartet; Goossens, Concerto; 
Bleuzet, Technique of the Oboe, Vols. I, II, and III ; ensemble 
playing. 

Clarinet 

FRESHMAN— Rose, Forty Studies; Langenus, Method for Clari- 
net, Part 3 (Virtuoso Studies) ; Weber, Concertino, Fantasy, and 
Rondo. 

Technic — Langenus, Scale Studies, or Klose Scale Studies. 

SOPHOMORE— Rose, Twenty Studies after Rode; Jeanjean, 25 
Etudes; Perrier, Trente etudes (after Bach, Handel, Dont, etc.) ; 
orchestral studies ; Weber and Mozart concertos. 

JUNIOR — Jeanjean, 18 Etudes; Perrier, Receuil de sonatas; or- 
chestral studies; Brahms; two sonatas and Hindemith Sonata. 



Description of Courses 59 



SENIOR — Jeanjean, 16 Etudes modernes ; Perrier, Vingt-deux 
Etudes modernes; Debussy, Rhapsodie; Reger, Bernstein and Tu- 
thel Sonatas. Advanced orchestral studies. 

Saxophone 

FRESHMAN— Labanchi-Iasilli, 33 Concert Etudes, Vol. I. 

Technic — Mule, Scales and Arpeggios, Vol. I. 

SOPHOMORE— Labanchi-Iasilli, 33 Concert Etudes, Vol. II and 
III; Sellner, Progressive Studies in Articulation; Glazounov, Con- 
certo. 

Technic — Mule, Scales and Arpeggios, Vol. II, 

JUNIOR — Bach-Corroyez, 24 Pieces for Saxophone, Capelle, 20 
Grand Studies; Bozza, 12 Etudes-Caprices; Ibert, Concertino da 
Camera. 

Technic — Mule, Scales and Arpeggios, Vol. III. 

SENIOR — Mule, 53 Studies, 18 Exercises from Barbiguier; De- 
cruck-Breilh 35 Modern Studies ; Rascher, Top Tones and 4 Octaves 
Studies; Bozza, Concertino. 

Bassoon 

FRESHMAN — Review of previous grades; reed making; Weissen- 
born. Studies, Vol. II, Opus 8 ; Milcle, Studies in all Keys ; Tele- 
mann. Sonata in F Minor, for bassoon, Vivaldi, sonatas, for violon- 
cello. 

SOPHOMORE— Reed making; Milde, selected studies from Con- 
cert Studies, Vols. I and II; Gambaro, 18 Etudes for Bassoon; 
Martelli, 15 Etudes ; Mozart, Concerto, K. 191 ; Hindemith, Sonata. 

JUNIOR — Milde, selected studies from Concert Studies, Vols. I 
and II; Pierne, New Technique of the Bassoon, Vol. II; Bozza, 
18 Daily Studies; Orefici, Bravura Studies; Orchesral studies 
(memorized). 

SENIOR — Reed making; Bertoni, 12 Modern Studies; Bozza, 15 
Daily Studies; orchestral studies (memorized) ; Jacob, Concerto; 
Bozza, Concertino; Mozart, Concerto, K. 191. 



60 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



BRASS _ 

Trumpet 

FRESHMAN — Fundamentals of tone production; elementary 
knowledge of major and minor scales and arpeggios. Schlossberg, 
Daily Drills ; Herbert Clark, Technical and Characteristic Studies ; 
Arban, Complete Method. 

SOPHOMORE — Continuation of major and minor scales and arpeg- 
gios ; Williams, Method for Trumpet, Vol. H ; Schlossberg, Daily 
Drills ; Goldman, Practical Studies ; Petite, Grand Etudes ; Laurent 
Books I and II; Introduction to transposition. Solos. 

JUNIOR — Concentration and development of embouchure; single, 
double and triple articulation ; transposition and application of 
basic technical skills. Schlossberg, Daily Drills ; Pietzsch, The 
Trumpet ; Solo repertoire ; introduction to orchestral parts. 

SENIOR — Study of more advanced etudes; Schlossberg, Daily 
Drills ; Solo repertoire ; intensive study of orchestral and band 
trumpet parts. 

Horn 

FRESHMAN — Fundamentals of tone production, including use of 
breath and tongue. Formation of embouchure ; types of articula- 
tion ; scales and intervals ; history and theory of the horn. Maxime- 
Alphonse; Deux cents etudes nouveUes, I and II. Easier orchestral 
passages and solos. Basic text-references, Farkas, the art of French 
Horn playing; Gregory, The Horn. 

SOPHOMORE — Transposition; stopping; trilling; endurance; ex- 
tension of range and volume. Maxime-Alphonse, III ; Kopprasch, 
Sixty Selected Stulies, I ; Classical and Romatic orchestral Pas- 
sages ; Mozart, Concertos I and III ; Beehoven, Sonatas ; F. Strauss, 
Concerto. 

JUNIOR — Problems of interpretation and performance practice. 
Maxime-Alphonse, IV (and V) ; Kopprasch, II; selected exercises 
from other studies. Less difficult passages from the Baroque, 
Strauss and the twentieth century. Mozart, Concertos II and IV; 
Saint-Saens, Morceau de Concert; Chabrier, Larghetto; R. Strauss, 
Concerto I; Hindemith, Sonata. 



Description of Courses 61 



SENIOR — Advanced technical problems. Maxime-Alphonse V (and 
VI) ; Schuler, Etudes; selected exercises from other studies. Dif- 
ficult orchestral passages. Haydn, Concertos; Mozart, Quintet; 
Schumann, Adagio and Allegro ; Brahms, Trio ; R. Strauss, II ; 
Britten, Serenade ; Porter, Sonata ; Hindemith, Concerto ; Heiden, 
Sonata. 

CLASSIC GUITAR 

Entrance Requirements 

The playing position of the guitar should be in conformity 
with proper and accepted form. Both hands should be held in the 
correct playing position and the student should be familiar with 
the use of rest and free strokes. The student should be able to play 
major and minor scales in first position with the use of the rest 
stroke and have acquired sufficient technique to be able to play 
through the first seventy (70) pages of Shearer's Classic Tech- 
nique Vol. I. 

FRESHMAN — Aaron Shearer, Classic Guitar Technique, Volume 
I; M. Carcassi, Method (Carl Fischer Edition) ; F. Sor, Etudes I-V; 
A. Segovia, Scales; Shearer, Scales. 

SOPHOMORE— M. Carcassi, Method (Carl Fischer Edition) ; Julio 
Sargreras Method, Vol. II ; Pascual Roch, Vol. I ; Schearer and 
Segovia, Scale Studies ; F. Sor, Etudes VI-X ; Selections from the 
works of Chilesotti, Bach, Tarrega, etc. Duets and Ensemble play- 
ing. 

JUNIOR — Julio Sagreras, Cols. Ill and IV ; Pascual Roch, Method 
Vol. I and II ; F. Sor, Etudes XI-XVI ; Repertoire from the works 
of Bach, Carulli, Tarrega, Albeniz, Villa-lobos, Ponce, etc. Duets 
and ensemble playing. 

SENIOR — Pascual Roch, Vols. II and III; Julio Sagreras, Vols. 
V and VI ; Aaron Shearer, Scales in all positions ; works of 
Castlenuovo-Tedesco ; Bach, Turina, Tansman, Villa-lobos, Ponce, 
etc. Duets and ensemble playing. 

OTHER ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS 

Entrance Requirements 

The entrance requirements for students of viola, brass, harp, 



62 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

woodwind and brass instruments stipulate the same degree of 
knowledge of the pianoforte as in the violin course. The student 
should also have acquired the elementary technique of his instru- 
ment. 

END OF SOPHOMORE YEAR— At the end of the second year the 
student should have acquired sufficient orchestra routine to fill 
satisfactorily a second desk position in sym.phonic works of lesser 
difficulty. He should have sufficient pianistic ability to be able to 
play simple accompaniments. 

END OF THE SENIOR YEAR— The candidate for graduation 
should demonstrate a well-grounded technique and an able control 
of his instrument. He should be able to appear successfully as 
soloist in a concerto or concert piece for his instrument. He should 
have acquired thorough orchestral routine sufficient to enable him 
to hold a desk position in a professional orchestra. He should also 
be able to read simple piano music at sight. The student should 
have completed during this course, four years of orchestral train- 
ing and a mimimum of two year's training in the perform.ance of 
chamber music. 

ORGAN 

Mu 131-2 FRESHMAN— ORGAN— Clarence Dickenson, Techniques in Organ 
Playing; Bach, Thirty Chorale Preludes from the Orgelbuechlein (Vol. V, 
Peters) ; Bach, Pastorale in F Major, 4 movements (Vol. 1, Peters) ; Bach, 
Fugue in B Minor, (Vol. IV, Peters). 3 hours per semester 

Mu 231-2 SOPHOMORE— ORGAN— Bach, Fifteen Chorale Preludes from the 
Orgelbuechlein (Vol. V, Peters) ; Bach, Canzona in D Minor (Vol. IV, 
Peters) ; Bach, Six Schuebler Chorales (Vols. VI and VII, Peters) ; Bach, 
Fantasie in G Major (Vol. IV, Peters) ; Bach, Toccata and Fugue in D 
Minor (Vol. IV, Peters). 3 hours per semester 

Mu 331-2 JUNIOR— ORGAN— Bach, Nun danket alle Gott (Vol. VII, No. 43, 
Peters) ; Bach, Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, (Vol. VII, No. 45, Peters) ; 
Bach, Nun komm, der Heiden Holland, (Vol. VII, No. 46, Peters) ; Bach, 
Allein Gott in der Hoh sei Ehr! Trio A Major (Vol. VI. No. 7, Peters); 
Bach, Schmueckbe dich, O liebe Seele (Vol. VII, No. 9, Peters) ; Bach, Fan- 
tasie in C Minor (Vol. IV, Peters) ; Bach, Prelude and Fugue in D Major 
(Vol. IV, Peters) ; Bach, Prelude and Fugue in G Minor (Vol. Ill, Peters) ; 
Bach, Fantasie and Fugue in C Minor (Vol. Ill, Peters) ; Bach, Trio 
Sonata in E Minor (Vol. I, No. 3, Peters) ; Bach, Buxtehude — Prelude and 
Fugue in G Minor. 3 hours per semester 

Junior Recital 

Mu 431-2 SENIOR— ORGAN— Bach, Prelude and Fugue in B Minor (Vol. 
II, No. 10, Peters) ; Bach, Prelude and Fugue in G Major (Vol. II, No. 8, 



Description of Courses 63 



Peters) ; Bach, Prelude and Fugue in C Major (Vol. II, No. 7, Peters) ; 
Bach, Prelude and Fugue in A Minor; Bach, Trio Sonata in E Flat Major 
(Vol. 1, No. 1, Peters) ; Hindemith, Sonatas 1, 2 and 3; Works from the 
early French school or organ playing by Couperin, de Grigny, Dumage 
and Marchand, etc.; Boehm, Prelude and Fugue in C Major; Luebeck, Pre- 
lude and Fugue in E Flat Major. 3 hours per semester 



Senior Recital 



^Department of rvludic ^herapu 

Charles E. Braswell., Chairman 

There is a growing recognition of music as a medium for 
rehabilitation of the mentally ill and the physically handicapped. 
This awareness has stimulated the development of music therapy 
as a profession. 

Music therapists work with adult psychiatric patients, geriat- 
rics, retarded and emotionally disturbed children, physical dis- 
abilities, and in special classrooms in the public schools. The music 
therapist is a trained psychiatric worker qualified to aid in diag- 
nosis, treatment, and rehabilitation. 

Loyola University offers both undergraduate and graduate 
education leading to the degrees, Bachelor of Music in Music 
Therapy and Master of Music in Music Therapy. The Loyola pro- 
gram meets the requirements specified by the National Association 
for Music Therapy and the National Association, Schools of Music. 

A limited number of scholarships is available to qualified 
students. For information, contact the Chairman of the Music 
Therapy Department. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Mu 114 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC THERAPY— A survey of music ther- 
apy, its history, basic concepts, and areas of clinical practice. A general 
information course, open to all students regardless of degree program. 

1 semester hoiir 

Mu 214 PRE-CLINICAL EXPERIENCE— Students are expected to work as 
volunteers in a psychiatric or rehabilitation institution for a period of two 
hours per week for one semester. 1 semester hour 

Mu 314 PRE-CLINICAL EXPERIENCE— Same as the above. 1 semester hour 



64 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



PSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATION— Loyola students are required to com- 
plete a psychological examination during the sophomore year. Results are 
sent to the Chairman of the Department. Transfer students should complete 
this examination before coming to Loyola. 

Mu 433 HOSPITAL TECHNIQUES IN MUSIC THERAPY— Procedures in- 
volved in developing and maintaining a goal-directed music therapy program 
in State, V.A., and private hospitals; programming for specific types of 
patients; techniques in dance therapy; rhythm band; group sing. 

2 semester hours 

Mu 454 PSYCHOLOGY OF MUSIC I— Acoustics of music; sound waves and 
their characteristics; vibratory sources of sounds; anatomy of the hearing 
process; theories of hearing; neural auditory connections to the cortex; the 
psychology of tone; nature of the aesthetic experience; tests of musicality 
and talent. 3 semester hours 

Mu 463 INFLUENCE OF MUSIC ON BEHAVIOR I— Historical orienta- 
tion, the medical use of music; the pre-Socratics; Plato and Aristotle; Aris- 
toxenus; the transmission of Greek knowledge to the Middle Ages; the 
beginnings of activity or adjunctive therapy, Pinel, Tuke, Simmel, Aichorn. 

3 semester hours 

Mu 444 HOSPITAL ORIENTATION— Review of psychiatric terminology; 
professional ethics; hospital organization, State, V.A. and private; manage- 
ment of neurotic and psychotic behavior. 2 semester hours 

Mu 483 CLINICAL TRAINING — Six months experience in an approved psy- 
chiatric hospital under the direction of a registered music therapist is 
required. If the student wishes to work in a setting other than the psy- 
chiatric hospital, an additional two months training is required in the 
speciality of his choice. 



^Department of il/luMc C^ducatl 



on 



Joe B. Buttram, Ph.D., Chairman 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Bachelor of Music Education degree is designed to prepare 
candidates to hold teaching positions in elementary and secondary 
schools. The degree is offered with three areas of emphasis. Stu- 
dents may elect to major in voice, piano or instrumental music. 
With the completion of the specified curriculum and all require- 
ments of the Louisiana State Board of Education, the student may 
be certified to teach in one or more of these areas. 

PREREQUISITES 

As an entering freshman, the candidate for the Bachelor of 
Music Education is required to meet minimum performance 



Description of Courses 65 



standards in the medium of his choice. If these standards have not 
been attained, the student will be advised to elect minor instrument 
study for the initial year or until the required standards are 
achieved. At this time the student may begin major instrument 
study. 

SCHOLARSHIP AID 

A limited number of scholarships is available to qualified 
students. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

The College of Music reco^nmends that all music majors attend the Music 
Workshop as well as stiident and faculty recitals. 

Mu 107-8; Mu 207-8, Mu 307-8; Mu 407-8 MUSIC WORKSHOP— A four year 
course consisting primarily of lectures, demonstrations, and performances by 
guest specialists in diverse fields of music; lectures and recitals by faculty 
members and students. 1 hour per year 

Mu 257 INSTRUMENT REPAIR — Demonstration and laboratory experience 
preparing the student to take care of instrument repair problems encounter- 
ed in a school band. Practical care and repair of woodwinds, brasses and 
percussion. 1 hour per semester 

Mu 267-8 WOODWIND CLASS— Fundamentals of embouchure formation, 
fingering, breathing; principles of pedagogy relating to all woodwind in- 
struments; use and relationship for band and orchestra;; methods and 
materials for elementary, junior, and senior high schools. 

2 hours per semester 

Mu 317-8 ESSENTIALS OF CONDUCTING— Vocal or Instrumental Con- 
ducting — Applied conducting and management. Basic conducting techniques; 
use of the baton; organization of the junior high school chorus; professional 
ethics; techniques for rehearsal and performance. 1 hour per semester 

Mu 417-8 INSTRUMENTAL OR CHORAL CONDUCTING— Basic conduct- 
ing techniques; use of the baton; applied conducting and management; band 
literature; techniques for rehearsal and performance. 1 hour per semester 

Mu 439 ELEMENTARY VOCAL METHODS— Rote singing and care of the 
child's voice; problems in tone and rhythm; games suitable for kindergarten, 
first and second grades; observation; sixth, seventh and eighth grades. 

1 hour per sequester 

Mu 440 HIGH SCHOOL VOCAL METHODS— The teaching of vocal music 
in the high school; materials for the chorus and glee club; musical entertain- 
ment; the conducting of vocal organizations. 1 hour per semester 

Mu 258 MUSIC ESSENTIALS AND METHODS FOR ELEMENTARY 
TEACHERS — A course for the elementary teacher in the fundamentals of 
music; elementary piano accompaniments; rhythm band activities; socio- 
logical and psychological uses of music. 3 hours per semester 



66 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



Ed 351 INSTRUMENTAL METHODS AND MATERIALS— The manage- 
ment and administration of instrumental organizations; the techniques of 
teaching homogeneous and heterogeneous classes; the use of recently 
published methods; problems of organizing, scheduling, drilling, uniforming 
and equipping bands and orchestras. 

2 hours per semester 

Mu 369-70 SCORING FOR BAND— A study of the instruments of the band, 
their range and tone qualities; practical study of the art of scoring for full 
concert and marching band. 1 hour per semester 

Mu 169-70 STAGE BAND LAB— Study and performance of modern Jazz 
for large band as well as for small ensemble. Opportunity for maximum 
development of students preparing for careers in jazz. 



Ok 



eoru 

Mu 001-2 THEORY — This course is designed for students without previous 
background who do not qualify for Mu 111. Qualification is determined by 
the theory placement test. Material covered will be musical nototion, key 
signatures, scales, intervals, rhythms, structure of triads, sight-singing and 
ear training. non-credit 

Mu 111-2 THEORY — Presentation of pitch and rhythmic notation; major and 
minor tonalities; intervals; all leading to vocal sight-singing. Triads of all 
types; non-harmonic tones; dominant seventh chord. Students are expected 
to acquire fluency in four primary categories, viz., a) sight-singing b) aural 
perception c) analysis at the keyboard d) use of devices in written harmoni- 
zation of melodies. Prerequisites Mu 001-2 of Theory Placement Test. 

S hours per semester 

Mu 211-2 THEORY — Continuation of Mu 111-2. Unusual doublings and part- 
writing techniques. Further study of non-harmonic tones; diatonic seventh 
chords; altered tones and chords studied as they are used in Bach chorales. 
Students are required to achieve proficiency in three categories, viz., a) 
sight-siging b) analysis at the keyboard c) use of devices in written harmo- 
nization of melodies. Prerequisite Mu 111-2. 3 hours per semester 

Mu 311-12 FORM AND ANALYSIS— The study of the structural melodic 
elements of musical forms, beginning with phrase construction and pro- 
gressing through all homophonic and contrapuntal forms. Formal and Func- 
tional harmonic analysis beginning with renaissance counterpoint and pro- 
gressing into the 20th century. Prerequisite: Mu 371-2. 

3 hours per semester 

Mu 371-2 COUNTERPOINT— A study of the technical devices of the contra- 
puntal practices of the late Baroque era. Analysis and writing of exercises 
in that style. The composition of an invention is required. Prerequisite 
Mu 212, 2 hours per semester 

Mu 471-2 CONTEMPORARY PRACTICES— An examination of the composi- 
tional and scoring techniques of various 20th century composers with the 
aim of reconciliation of the new in music with the traditional. Prerequisite; 
Mu 371-2, 2 hours per semester 



Description of Courses 67 



Mu 259-60; 359-60; 459-60 SCORE ANALYSIS— A seminar course using a 
specific composition (designated by the instructor) as a point of departure 
and examining various facets of music. This course is open to any student 
above the level of first year theory courses. 1 hour per semester 

Mu 297-8 ESSENTIALS OF COMPOSITION— A preliminary course in which 
the structure of melody, behavior of harmonic sonorities, and composition 
devices are studied in detail. 1 hour per sernester 

Mu 397-8 COMPOSITION — A study involving composition in the media, 
forms, and using the harmonic-melodic materials specified by the instructor. 
The completion of at least one work per semester is required. Prerequisite; 
Mu 297-8, 4- hours per semester 

Mu 497-8 COMPOSITION— Free composition. Composition of at least three 
works is required, one of which must be a work for band, chorus, orchestra, 
or a major work for an ensemble approved by the instructor. Prerequisite; 
Mu 397-8. J^ hours per semester 

Mu 383-4 ORCHESTRATION— Score reading; study of instrumentation; 
ranges, timbres, and capabilities of instruments, scoring for string, reed, 
and brass groups; scoring for full orchestra; transcribing music for 
orchestra; composing for orchestra. 2 hours per semester 



ivludlc ^J^idtoru and rJLitepat 



¥ 



lerarure 



Mu 167-8 MUSIC APPRECIATION— A course designed for beginning stu- 
dents or non-music majors stressing basics of musical art; listening techni- 
ques: melody, harmony, rhythm, textures; form types: imitative, variation, 
improvisatory, sectional; timbre. Standard repertoire in all media will be 
emphasized. 2 hours per sequester 

Mu 237 MUSIC HISTORY— Music of the Greek civilization; music of the 
early Christian era; the beginnings of polyphony; the development of nota- 
tion; early instrumental music; sacred and secular music of the Renais- 
sance. Prerequisite: Mu 167-8. 2 semester hours 

Mu 238 MUSIC HISTORY— A combined lecture and listening course com- 
prehensively examining music in all media in the Baroque era. Prerequisite: 
Mu 237 or approval of the instructor. 2 semester hours 

Mu 337 MUSIC HISTORY— The Classic and Romantic eras; considering the 
development of style, form, and technique as well as the practice of per- 
formance. Prerequisite: Mu 238 or approval of the instructor. 

2 semester hours 

Mu 338 MUSIC HISTORY — A history and literature course in the music 
of the 20th century; transition from the late Romantic era to the present 
day through a detailed study of various representative works. Prerequisite; 
Mu 337 or approval of the instructor. 2 semester hours 

Mu 437 INTRODUCTION TO OPERA— A lecture period familiarizing the 
student with the background, text, and music of the standard operatic re- 
pertoire. This will be complimented by two hours of laboratory, consisting 
of attendance at the Opera Workshop classes where dramatic technique and 
the production phase of musical theater will be demonstrated. 

2 semester hours 



68 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



Mu 131-2; Mu231-2; Mu331-2; Mu431-2 MADRIGAL SINGERS— A vocal 
ensemble stressing music from the 14th through the 18th Century. Emphasis 
on performance of chansons and madrigals of the early Renaissance. 

1 hour per semester 

Mu 135-136; Mu 235-236; Mu 335-336; Mu 435-436 OPERA WORKSHOP— 
Designed to instruct singers in general stage deportment and to familiarize 
the student with standard operatic literature. Roles are assigned in scenes 
from various operas to be memorized. Upon completion of the course, the 
student is expected to perform before a live audience. The stress is upon 
opera that is good theatre; every opportunity is given for freedom of ex- 
pression. The workshop meets four hours a week. (Required for all voice 
students). 1 hour per semester 

Mu 155-156; Mu 255-256; Mu 355-356; Mu 455-456 WOODWIND ENSEMBLE 
— Study and performance of chamber music for all combinations of woodwind 
instruments, such as woodwind quintet, quartets and trios ; quartets of flutes, 
clarinets and saxophones; other groups of woodwinds with strings. (Mem- 
bership by audition). 1 hour per sertiester 

Mu 165-166; Mu 265-266; Mu 365-366; Mu 465-466 BRASS ENSEMBLE— 
Practical experience in ensemble playing for such groups as trios, quartets 
and quintets of various instrumentation. (Membership by audition). 

1 hour per semester 

Mu 169-70; Mu 269-70; Mu 369-70; Mu 469-70 STAGE BAND— An ensemble 
for the study of literature and rehearsal techniques for the Stage Band; 
performance and scoring. Students accepted by audition 1 hour per semester 

Mu 175-6; Mu 265-6; Mu 375-6; Mu 475-6 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHORUS 
Open to all university students. The performance of a standard repertoire 
from all major works of choral literature. 1 hour per semester 

Mu 195-196; Mu 295-296; Mu 395-396; Mu 495-496 UNIVERSITY BAND— 
Rehearsals and public concerts in the University Band. Membership by 
audition. Attendance at all rehearsals and public concerts obligatory. 

1 hour per semester 

Mu 345-6 CHAMBER MUSIC— A study of music for small groups of instru- 
ments from the sixteenth century to the present day. The course includes 
analysis of the music and a study of the instruments for which it is scored. 

1 hour per sernester 

Mu 445-6 CHAMBER MUSIC— Similar to Chamber Music 345-6, but broader 
in scope and more detailed in treatment. 1 hour per semester 

Mu 120 BALLET — A course designed for beginners. Basic steps. Combination 
steps in 4/4 and 3/4 tempo. Introductory steps of elevation. Barre Floor 
exercises (French and English translation). Notebook required. 

1 hour per semester 

Mu 130 BALLET— Continuation of 120. Allegro, Adagio, Port de Bras Pos- 
ture, Pirouette, Elevation. Study of Ballet from Renaissance to the modern 
Russian School. Terms in French and English. Notebook required. 

1 hour per semester 



Description of Courses 69 



I'^eciuireci ^^cademic C-< 



'^ 



our6eS 



In order to meet the requirements of the National Association 
of Schools of Music the following standards have been set: 

(a) With Voice as a Major, a minimum of 24 and a maximum 
of 30 semester hours of academic and cultural courses are required, 
to include at least 10 semester hours in modern language and addi- 
tional courses in languages, English poetry, drama, and correlated 
arts. 

(b) With an Instrument or Com.position as a Major, a min- 
imum of 18 and a maximum of 30 semester hours are required in 
subjects of a general cultural value. 

For the description of academic subjects, consult the Bulletin 
of College of Arts and Sciences. 



Ljradi 



til 



uauon 



To receive a degree in the Loyola University College of Music, 
a student is required : 

1. To have established residence of at least one academic year 
in v^^hich not less than thirty-two semester hours of credit have 
been earned at Loyola in the theory of music and in applied music 
and in other subjects required for graduation at Loyola University. 

2. To have completed with satisfaction the curriculum appro- 
priate to the degree as outlined in the detailed programs of studies. 
This curriculum is normally achieved at the rate of thirty-two or 
more semester hours a year. 

3. To have presented at the beginning of the scholastic year in 
which the candidate expects to complete his work for the degree a 
formal written application to the Registrar for this degree. 

4. To have demonstrated in public recital his ability to sing or 
to perform in a satisfactory manner upon his major or principal 
instrument. 



70 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

5. To have satisfactorily passed an oral and written compre- 
hensive examination. 

6. To have paid his graduation fee and have discharged all 
other financial indebtedness to Loyola University at least one 
month before the date of graduation. 

All candidates must be present at the Commencement Exercises 
and receive their degrees in person. No excuse outside of serious 
illness attested by a reputable physician will be accepted. The Uni- 
versity will not confer degrees in absentia. 



Graduate Department 71 



6". 



raduate &Departntent 

Joe B. Buttram, Ph.D., Chairman 

PURPOSE 

The Graduate Division of the College of Music offers two 
degrees, the Master of Music Education and the Master of Music 
in Music Therapy. The Master of Music Education degree is de- 
signed for members of the teaching profession. The intent of the 
degree is the development of professional leadership capabilities 
with emphasis on scholarly research. The Music Therapy Depart- 
ment offers a program of graduate study designed to provide 
serious students with opportunities to achieve advanced profes- 
sional, behavioral and musical knowledge. In addition, techniques 
of scholarly writing and research are emphasized. 

ADMISSION 

In order to pursue the Master of Music Education degree, the 
applicant must hold a Bachelor of Music Education degree, or its 
equivalent, from a recognized institution. Those applicants holding 
a Bachelor's degree but not meeting the educational requirements 
for state certification in music may also pursue the degree, but 
m.ust fulfill all deficiencies for certification before being formally 
admitted to candidacy. Applicants for the Master of Music Therapy 
degree are required to have a Bachelor of Music Therapy degree 
from an institution approved by the National Association for 
Music Therapy. In lieu of this, students having music degrees with 
majors other than music therapy may be accepted on a provisional 
basis providing all undergraduate requirements for the music 
therapy degree are fulfilled. 

Certain candidates not meeting the above requirements may 
be allowed to take specific courses for graduate credit. These candi- 
dates may be admitted as "out-of -course" students at the discretion 
of the Chairman of the Graduate Department, College of Music. 
Among these may be candidates already possessing a Master's 
degree who wish to secure additional graduate hours. 

Undergraduate students of Loyola University who lack no 
more than six semester hours of credit for a Bachelor's degree and 
who have attained a "B" average or better in upper division work 



72 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

may be allowed to register for a maximum of six semester hours 
of graduate work. These students must follow regular admission 
procedure and the total program of graduate and undergraduate 
work at that tim.e may not exceed twelve semester hours. 

To be considered for admission to the Graduate Division, the 
following must be accomplished : 

1. The applicant must make formal application to the Grad- 
uate School one month before the beginning of the session 
when the student plans to begin graduate work. Applica- 
tion forms may be obtained from the Graduate School, 
Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118. 

2. The applicant must write to the Registrar of each college 
previously attended and request an official transcript in 
duplicate of all undergraduate and graduate work. These 
transcripts must be sent by the college to the Graduate 
School. 

3. The applicant is required to complete the Miller Analogies 
Test. Results of this test are to be sent to the Chairman 
of the Graduate Department, College of Music. 

4. The applicant for the Master of Music Therapy degree 
must take a battery of standard psychological tests. It is 
recommended that a professional testing agency be em- 
ployed for this purpose. Results of these tests are to be 
sent directly to the Chairman of the Music Therapy De- 
partment. 

5. A personal interview with the Chairman of the Graduate 
Division, College of Music or the Chairman of the Music 
Therapy Departm.ent is usually required. 

On the basis of the above information, the applicant may be 
admitted to the Graduate Division. All students are accepted in- 
itially on a provisional basis. After successful completion of twelve 
hours of graduate work (i.e., with a "B" average) and fulfillment 
of all prerequisites, the applicant may be formally admitted to 
candidacy. This decision will require the consent of the Graduate 
Committee of the College of Music. 



Graduate Department 73 



RESIDENCE 

Both graduate degrees offered by the College of Music require 
a minimum of 32 semester hours of graduate work including thesis. 
This work must include one semester^ or its equivalent in summer 
terms, as a full-time student. Ordinarily, two summer terms will 
be interpreted as meeting this minimum requirement. A student 
may enroll for a maximum of twelve sem^ester hours during the 
regular term and a maximum of nine semester hours during the 
summer session. A full-time teacher who wishes to take courses 
during the regular term may enroll for a m^aximum of six hours 
per semester. Students may transfer a maximum of six hours of 
graduate credit from another college which may apply toward the 
Master's degree. Acceptance of such credit will be at the discretion 
of the Graduate Committee of the College of Music. 

LIMIT OF TIME 

Work completed more than six years before the date on which 
the Master's degree is to be conferred will not be accepted in 
fulfillment of requirem.ents for the degree. 

FEES 

The tuition fee for full-time students (9-12 hours) is $450.00. 
The fee for part time courses (including summer) is $50.00 per 
semester hour, except for accredited teachers and members of a 
religious community. 

For accredited teachers the tuition fee is $40.00 per semester 
hour. The teacher's certificate accompanied by a statement of 
present employm.ent should be presented to the Registrar for in- 
spection at the time of registration. The tuition fee for members 
of a religious community is $30.00 per semester hour. 

A registration fee of $5.00 and a library fee of $5.00 are 
charged each semester. A non-refundable application fee of $10.00 
payable to Loyola University must accompany an application for 
admission to the program. 



74 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 
Master of Music Education 

The Master of Music Education consists of a minimum of 32 
semester hours chosen from the following: 

MUSIC EDUCATION 16 Hours 

Required Courses: 
Mu590 — Seminar in Research Methods 1 

Mu591— Thesis 3-4 

Mu551 — Organization of School Music 3 

Courses may be elected from the 
following to complete the required 
16 hours : 
*Mu454 — Psychology of Music I 3 

Mu554— Psychology of Music II 2 

Mu463 — Influence of Music on Behavior I 3 

Mu572 — Research in Music Education 2-5 

Mu521— Special Problems 1-2 

GENERAL MUSIC 10 Hours 

Required Coures: 

Mu527 — Applied Music 1 hour and/or a qual- 

ifying examination 
Mu537 — Orchestral Literature 3 

Courses may be elected from the 

following to complete the required 

10 hours: 
Mu511 — Pedagogy of Theory 3 

Mu567 — Composition 8 

Mu585 — Advanced Scoring 3 

EDUCATION 6 Hours 

Required Coures: 

**Ed490 — Methodology of Education Research 3 

Courses may be elected from the 

following to complete the required 

6 hours: 
Ed401 — Philosophy of Education 3 

Ed443 — Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

Ed491 — Statistics in Education 3 

* Students may take a minimum of six hours of 400 level (undergraduate) 
courses which may apply to the graduate degree. 
**Graduate Courses in the School of Education are numbered from 400 to 499. 

Master of Music in Music Therapy 

The Master of Music in Music Therapy consists of a minimum 
of 32 semester hours chosen from the following : 



Graduate Department 75 



Required Courses: 

*Psy403 — Experimental Design 3 

Mu 554 — Psychology of Music II 2 

Mu 563— Influence of Music II 2 

Mu 573 — Research in Music Therapy 3 

Mu 591— Thesis 4 to 6 

Electives I 

**Mu 418 — Advanced Choral Conducting 2 

Mu 511 — Pedagogy of Theory 3 

Mu 537 — Orchestral Literature 3 

Mu 567 — Advanced Composition 3 

Mu 585 — Advanced Orchestration 3 

^Graduate Courses in the College of Education and in the Psychology Depart- 
ment are numbered from 400 to 499. 
**A minimum of six hours of 400 level (undergraduate) courses from the 
College of Music may be elected to apply to the graduate degree. 

Electives II 

Psy Group Dynamics and Theory 3 

Psy Psychopathology 3 

Psy Personality Theory 3 

Ed431 Mental Hygiene and Psychology of 

Personality Adjustment 3 

Ed452 Advanced Child Psychology 3 

Ed453 Advanced Adolescent Psychology 3 

Sd470 Principles of Guidance 3 

In addition to the required or core courses, a minimum of five hours must be 
selected from subjects similar to those listed in Electives I, and a minimum 
of nine hours selected from subjects similar to those listed in Electives II- 



Description of Courses 

Mu 454 PSYCHOLOGY OF MUSIC I— Acoustics of music; sound waves and 
their characteristics; vibratory sources of sounds; anatomy of hearing; 
neural auditory connections to the cortex; the psychology of tone; nature 
of the aesthetic experience; tests of musicality and talent. 

3 semester hours 

Mu 463 INFLUENCE OF MUSIC ON BEHAVIOR I— Historical orienta- 
tion, the medical use of music: the pre-Socratics; Plato and Aristotle; 
Aristoxenus; the transmission of Greek knowledge to the Middle Ages; the 
beginnings of activity or adjuctive therapy, Pinel, Tuke, Simmel, Aichorn. 

3 semester hours 

Mu 511 PEDAGOGY OF THEORY— Presentation of the various approaches 
to the teaching of theory with special emphasis on the primary and secondary 
levels. Auditing of undergraduate theory classes is required. 

3 semester hoiirs 

Mu 514 RESEARCH IN MUSIC THERAPY— Original investigations in the 
field of Music Therapy. Seminar. 3 semester hours 



76 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



Mu 521 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MUSIC EDUCATION— Individual study 
in an area of interest and significance under the supervision of a faculty- 
member. 1 to 2 sonester hoius 

Mu 527 APPLIED MUSIC — Private study. The student must display a mini- 
mum level of performing ability on his designated major instrument (in- 
cluding voice). 1 semester hour and/ or a qualifying examination 

Mu 537 ORCHESTRAL LITERATURE— Survey of orchestral literature 
from the Baroque to the present including stylistic analysis of selected 
works. 3 seinester hours 

Mu 551 ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL MUSIC— A study of music educa- 
tion, its historical development, its position in the context of educational 
philosophy and psychology, recent trends and the place of music in the 
school curriculum; criteria for the evaluation of activities, courses, mater- 
ials and methods in a well-balanced program of music. 3 semester hours 

Mu 554 PSYCHOLOGY OF MUSIC II— Techniques and instrumentation for 
research in the psychology of music. Lecture and laboratory. 

2 semester hours 

Mu 563 INFLUENCE OF MUSIC ON BEHAVIOR II— Man and music; 
Processes in Music Therapy; The Community Concept in Music Therapy. 

3 semester hours 

Mu 567 COMPOSITION — Admittance by consent of instructor only. 

1 to 3 sequester hours 

Mu 572 RESEARCH IN MUSIC EDUCATION— Original investigations in the 
field of music education. 2-5 semester hours 

Mu 585 ADVANCED SCORING— The study of scoring for various media 
such as concert band, marching band, chorus, string orchestra and full 
orchestra; course structured to individual student's need and interest. 

3 semester hours 

Mu 590 SEMINAR IN RESEARCH—Required of all Master's candidates, 
enrollment must be concurrent with the student's first semester in the 
graduate program; techniques in research and writing crucial to the com- 
pletion of the thesis. 1 semester hour 

Mu 591 THESIS. 3 to 6 semester hours 



cJ^ouoia i^oncerts 



J 



STUDENT 

October 3 — 

ALFRED LEMMON, JAMES MEEHAN, EDWARD DONNELLY, 
CHARMAINE MORALES, BARBARA LAWRENCE, Organists 
MADRIGAL SINGERS, ELISE CAMBON, Director 

October 17 — 

EUGENE FLUSCHE, Clarinetist, ROBERT ROUX, Pianist Sonata 
Recital 

October SI- 
ALFRED LEMMON, JAMES MEEHAN, EDWARD DONNELLY, 
CHARMAINE MORALES, BARBARA LAWRENCE, Organists 
MADRIGAL SINGERS, ELISE CAMBON, Director 

November 7 — 

MELANIE OUSTALET, Mezzo-Soprano, VICKI FISK, Soprano 
EDWARD SCHLOTTER, Accompanist, Recital of Oratorio Arias 

November 14 — 

SARAH VIRGINIA GLORIOSO, Pianist— Senior Recital 

LA JUAN EDLUND and EDWARD McINNIS, French Horns 

ROBERT ROUX, Accompanist 

November 28 — 

BRASS CLASS (Beginners) 
November 21 — 

LOYOLA BRASS ENSEMBLE, GEORGE JANSEN, Director 
LOYOLA WOODWIND QUINTET, LARRY COMBS, Director 

December 1 — 

CONSTANCE ADORNO, Soprano— Senior Recital 
December 5 — 

SHARON PELISSIER, Mezzo-Soprano— Junior Recital 
ELIZABETH SCHWARZ, Accompanist 

December 12 — 

CHERYL ARCENEAUX and RICHARD GREENE, Guitarists 
LOYOLA CHORUS, ELISE CAMBON, Director— Christmas Carols 

January 18, 19, 20— 

OPERA WORKSHOP, ARTHUR COSENZA, Director 
EUGIE PASSERA and FLORENCE PRESTI, Accompanists 
Scenes from Marriage of Figaro, Carmen and Madame Butterfly. 
R.S.V.P. by Offenbach 

77 



78 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



January 28 — 

CHA'rMAINE morales, ALFRED LEMMON, EDWARD DON- 
NELLY and JAMES MEEHAN, Organists 

January 30 — 

LINDA BARBALICH, Pianist— Junior..Recital 

February 2 — 

CARMEN BETANCOURT, Guitarist— Senior Recital 

February 20 — 

LINDA GOLDBERG, Clarinetist— Junior Recital 

ROBERT ROUX, Accompanist 

TRIO, LINDA GOLDBERG and GAYLE BREAUX, Clarinetists 

EDWARD McINNIS, French Horn 

February 27 — 

RAPHAEL FRANSEN and JOHN VIDACOVICH, Percussionists 

March 15 — 

JUDY BARON and MARIE ARMBRUSTER, Pianists— Senior 
Recital 

March 29— 

HENRY R. MACKIE, Guitarist— Senior Recital 

April 5 — 

NANCY CLEGERN, Pianist— Senior Recital 

April 26— 

ALEXANDER TILIAKOS, Oboist— Senior Recital 

April 28— 

CHORUS and MADRIGAL SINGERS, ELISE CAMBON, Director, 
Delgado Museum of Art. 

May 23, 24, 25— 

OPERA WORKSHOP, ARTHUR COSENZA, Director 
EUGIE PASSERA and FLORENCE PRESTI, Accompanists 

GUEST ARTISTS 

October 24— 

MUSICA da CAMARA— CARTER CRAWFORD, Violin and Record- 
er; BARBARA HENRY, Recorder and Krumhorn; MILTON SCHEU- 
ERMANN, Recorder and Harpsichord; AUDREY YATES, Voice and 
Recorder. 
14th and 16th Century Music 

November 21 — 

THE SINGING MOTHERS— RENE BURTON, Chorister; 
LOLA WILLIAMS, Accompanist 

March 19 — 

JAMES DICK, Concert Pianist; Lecture 

April 22— 

SKITCH HENDERSON, Composer, Conductor, Pianist and Record- 
ing Artist. 



^acuttu I ublicatlond 



JAMES W. BASTIEN 



Elementary Piano Pedagogy Materials. 
Playtime at the Piano, Books 1 and 2. 
Piano Literature for the Intermediate Grades. 

GWM Music Company, Publishers, Chicago, 111. 
Recording: Smisor-Bastien Duo Piano Recital Concert 

12", 33 1/3 Stereo L.P., GWM Records, Chicago, 111. 

CHARLES E. BRASWELL 

E. T. Gaston, Charles Braswell, et ah, (eds.) Music in Therapy. New- 
York, Macmilliam, 1968. 

"Introduction" Part VII, "Music Therapy in the Community." ibid. 

"Social Facility and Mental Illness," ibid. 

Reviews: Smalley, Ruth Elizabeth, Theory for Social Work Practice. 
Columbia University Press, New York; Anderson, Warren D., Ethos 
and Education in Greek Music, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 
Mass.; Hartogs, Renatus, with Hans Fantel, Four-Letter Word Games. 
The Psychology of Obscenity, Delacore Press, New York, 1967. 

Reviews in. Journal of Music Therapy, 1967 Issues. 

"Changing Concepts in Treatment," Journal of Music Therapy. 4-2 (1967) 
63-66. 

JOE B. BUTTRAM 

Ego-Oriented Casework, Problems and Perspectives, Howard J. Parad and 
Roger R. Miller, editors, Family Service Association of America, New 
York, 1963, review in Journal of Miisic Therapy, 1967 issue. 
T-Group Theory and Laboratory Method, L. P. Bradford, J. R. Gibb, and 
K. D. Benne, editors, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 1964, review 
in Journal of Music Therapy, 1967 Issue. 

History of Psychology, An Overvieiv, Henryk Misiak and Virginia Staudt 
Sexton, Grune and Stratton, New York 1966, review in Journal of 
Music Therapy, 1967 issue. 

Foundations of Behavioral Research, Fred N. Kerlinger, Holt, Rinehart 
and Winston, Inc., New York, 1964, review in Journal of Music Therapy, 
1967 issue. 



79 



^acuttu aU^eciare:i^ vUophskopS 
and ^.^ctiuitied 

JAMES W. BASTIEN 

Workshop and Lecture — Demonstration tour presenting new materials. 

Cities visited; Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston, Chicago, 

Minneapolis, Kansas City, Wichita, Tulsa, University of North Carolina 

at Greensboro and New Orleans. 
Adjudication for Mississippi Music Teachers Association, Hattiesburg, 

Mississippi, 
Adjudication for New Orleans Music Teachers National Association. 

Lecture, South Central Regional Convention, New Orleans Music 

Teachers Association. "Class Technique" (relating early level technical 

training to theory). 
Recital with Frederick Balaz, violinist. Carey College, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

CHARLES E. BRASWELL 

Music Therapy Workshop, Central Louisiana State Hospital, Pineville, 
Louisiana. "Graduate Education in Music Therapy." 

New Orleans Music Teachers Association, "Psychiatric Music Therapy." 
Danna Center, Loyola University. 

Series of Nine Community Lectures, Sponsored by the Music Therapy 
Fund, Louisiana Association for Mental Health and the Louisiana 
Federation of Music Clubs. This series established through a grant from 
the Music Therapy Fund, Edward G. Schlieder Foundation and the 
Libby-Dufour Foundation. 

National Association for Music Therapy, National Convention, Atlanta, 
Georgia, November 23-25, 1967. "Music Therapy and Community Psy- 
chiatry." Music Teachers National Association, Southern Regional Con- 
vention, "Psychiatric Music Therapy." 

Delgado College, New Orleans, Series of fifteen lectures and Xavier Uni- 
versity, New Orleans, series of fifteen lectures: "Psychiatric Music 
Therapy." 

National Institute of Mental Health Lectures, "Music Therapy and Com- 
munity Mental Health." Kansas University, Lawrence, Kansas. 
Adjudication: Piano Festival, Nicholls State College, Thibodaux, La. 

JOE B. BUTTRAM 

Music Therapy Workshop, Central Louisiana State Hospital, Pineville, 
Louisiana. "Social Facility, An Experimental Approach to Music 
Therapy." 

Music Therapy and Vocational Rehabilitation, An Experimental Ap- 
proach." New Orleans Music Teachers Association. 

80 



Faculty Lectures, Workshops and Activities 81 



National Association for Music Therapy, National Convention, Atlanta, 

Georgia, November 23-25, 1967. 
Adjudication: Solo and Ensemble Festival, Nichols State College, Thibo- 

daux, Louisiana. 
Solo and Ensemble Festival, L.M.E.A. District VI, New Orleans, La. 

Clinician: Loyola Band Clinic. 

MICHAEL J. CARUBBA 

President, New Orleans Music Teachers Association, 1967. 

Evaluation, Spring Hill College Upward Bound Project, Spring Hill, Ala- 
bama, July 1967. 

Committee on Wages, American Federation of Musicians, Local 174, New 
Orleans, Louisiana. 

National Association of Schools of Music Convention, Chicago, Illinois, 
November 24-26, 1968. 

Local Chairman for Music Teachers National Association Convention, 
February 11-14, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Educational Projects, Incorporated Meetings, Chicago, Illinois, November 
12, 13, 1968. 

Educational Projects, Incorporated Meeting. Little Rock, Arkansas, May 
3, 4, 1968. 

Adjudicator for Louisiana District III, L.M.E.A. Solo and Ensemble 
Festival, March, 1968, University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, 
Louisiana. 

Adjudicator for L.M.E.A., District VII Band Festival, Nicholls State 
College, Thibodaux, Louisiana, April 2, 3, 4, 1968. 

Chairman for Cultural Attractions Fund of Greater New Orleans for 
Loyola University. 

Board of Directors — Jazzfest 1968 — New Orleans, Louisiana. 

President's Council on Physical Fitness, Loyola Field House, April, 1968. 

Adjudicator "Miss Dance of Louisiana Pageant", April 6, 1968, New 
Orleans, Louisiana. 

Teachers' Music Symposium with Louisiana Council for Music and Per- 
forming Arts, Inc., featuring Mr. Howard Mitchell, Conductor of the 
Washington National Symphony Orchestra, New Orleans, Louisiana, 
May 10, 1968. 

Resident Fellow for the Fort Valley State College, Upward Bound Pro- 
gram, Fort Valley, Georgia, June 28, 29, 30, 1968. 

ARTHUR COSENZA 

Director, Les Pecheurs de Perles, Aida, Faust, Madama Butterfly, Mac- 
beth, Lucia de Lamermoor, II Trovatore, I Pagliacci, New Orleans, 
Opera House Association. 

La Traviata, Houston Grand Opera Company, Houston, Texas. Caval- 
leria Rusticana, I Pagliacci, Shreveport Civic Opera, Shreveport, Louisi- 
ana. 

Secret of Suzanne, Cavalleria Rusticana, il Trovatore and Aida, Jackson 
Opera Guild, Jackson, Mississippi, Duo-Recital with Marietta Cosenza, 

Orleans Club. 

Lecture-Les Pecheurs de Perles, "The Role of the Workshop in the 
World of Opera." New Orleans Opera Guild. 



cyLouoia L//nii/er5uu (A5and 



>uoia i/inwerjiiu 



lies 

September 7 — Program — Presentation New Orleans Saints Football 

Team 
October 2 — United Fund Concert, Danna Center 
October 4 — Concert Loyola Womens Council 
October 15 — Family Afternoon Concert — City Park 
October 19 — Opening Game, New Orleans Buccaneers Basketball Team 

Loyola Field House 
October 22 — Family Afternoon Concert — Audubon Park 
November 2-4 — Opera Band in Production of "Macbeth" by Verdi for 
N.O. Opera Association. Municipal Auditorium. 

November 10 — Homecoming — Loyola Field House 

December 3 — United Negro College Fund — Intercollegiate Concert 

December 10 — Concert, St. Joseph Abbey, St. Benedict, La. 

December 15 — Concert, 50th Anniversary Girl Scouts of America 

January 13-14 — Formal Winter Concert and Loyola Ballet 

January 31 — Loyola Basketball Game — Field House 

February 7 — Loyola Basketball Game — Field House 

February 20 — Loyola Basketball Game — Field House 

February 22 — Loyola Basketball Game — Field House 

April 21 — Band Clinic — Mr. Skitch Henderson 

April 22 — Band Concert — Mr. Skitch Henderson, Guest Conductor 

April 24 — Award Day 

May 15 — Graduation 



(J3t'a55 and l/i/oodwlnd C^ndemhled 

December 4 — Concert, N.O. Music Teachers Association 

December 5 — Concert, Music Workshop — College of Music 

February 14— Educational Program— WYES-TV 

February 21— Educational Program— WYES-TV 

March 12-13— Tour High Schools 

May 15 — Brass Ensemble — Baccalaureate Mass, Holy Name Church 

83 



A 



w 



ointments 

1967-1968 



CHARLES E. BRASWELL 

Second Vice-President and Membership Chairman, National Association 

for Music Therapy. 
Associate Editor, Journal for Music Therapy. 
Chairman, Music Therapy Division, and Member, Board of Directors, 

New Orleans Music Teachers Association. 
Member, Committee on Research, National Association for Music Therapy. 
Member, Committee on Curricula, National Association for Music Therapy. 

JOE B. BUTTRAM 

Member, Committee for the Development of a University Testing Center, 

Loyola University. 
Consultant in Music Education, Delgado College, New Orleans, Louisiana. 



82 



84 LOYOLA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



Joseph G. Hebert, Director 

November 22 — High School Tour 

December 2 — Blue Key Talent Night, Loyola Field House 

January 5-6-7 — Southwest Louisiana Tour 

January 17 — Southwest Louisiana Tour 

February 16-17 — Mobile Jazz Festival, Mobile, Alabama 

Best Band Award 

Trophy Sponsored by Trans World Airlines 
June 22-24 — National Collegiate Jazz Festival, St. Louis, Mo. 



-^ete 



evLAion 



January 15— Concert— WWL-TV 

January 17— Stage Band— WWL-TV 

February 14 — Brass Ensemble — WYES-TV Educational Program 

February 19 — Woodwind Ensemble — WYES-TV Educational Program 



1967 - 1968 



Werlein Awards (Upon Faculty Recommendation) 

Piano MARIE ARMBRUSTER 

Honorable Mention LINDA BARBALICH 

Guitar CARMEN BETANCOURT 

Honorable Mention HENRY MACKIE 

Brass JAY CHERNETZ 

Honorable Mention THOMAS WILSON 

Woodwind LOGAN BOUDREAUX 

Honorable Mention GENE FLUSCHE 

Organ CHARMAINE MORALES 

Chorus ROBERT ROUX 

Opera Workshop SHARON PELISSIER 

Music Therapy VICTORIA VAUTHIER 

Band ALEXANDER TILIAKOS 

Stage Band CHARLES BRENT 

Honorable Mention JOHN BREM 

College of Music Award MARIE ARMBRUSTER 

Who's Who in American Universities and Colleges 

ALEXANDER TILIAKOS 
LOGAN BOUDREAUX 



85 



c>Dearee5 (conferred 



Bachelor of Music Education 

Constance Ann Adorno Logan Paul Boudreaux, Jr. 

Marie Antoinette Armbruster Sarah Virginia Glorioso 

Wayne Anthony Maranto 

Bachelor of Music in Music Therapy 

Carolyn Elizabeth Arceneaux Carmen Josefina Betancourt 

Judy Anne Baron Victoria Lenora Vauthier 

Bachelor of Music 

Nancy Shelton Clegern Edward Stephen Schlotter, Jr. 

Henry Rivet Mackie Alexander John Tiliakos 



B-1374, 6-68 

86 



m, 



emo 



w. 



emo 



cJLouola Ljniuerditu (/^utleti 



}uoia uimuerdiiu 



eiin 



Vol. XLX September, 1968 No. 6 



Published in the months of January, April, 
May, June, August and September starting 
in 1952. 

Second Class postage paid at New Orleans, La. 



Loyola University 

Incorporated April 15, 1912. Autho- 
rized to grant degrees by the General 
Assembly of Louisiana for the year 
1912. 

The Legal and Corporate Title of the 
University is "Loyola University, New 
Orleans." 

All donations, endowments, legacies, 
bequests, etc., should be made under 
this title. 



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